Adding a laminate to an existing bow

MBK

New member
Good afternoon all!
I have an AFB that I do like shooting but I have a strange/ daft/ suicidal request. As I am getting a new bow anyway, what do you think of my idea to add an extra layer of glass laminate to the back of the bow? Would it make any difference to the speed/ draw weight?
I'm a field archer and have noticed the cast of this bow drops quite suddenly after about 25-30yds. I mean Suddenly!
Is it worth trying or am I just as likely to kill the bow?
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
It's a bad idea as it would give an imbalance between belly and back IMO, and would probably raise the draw weight insanely.(As stiffness is proportional to the cube of the thickness).
You are probably using the wrong terminology when you say 'cast'. The cast can't drop off IMO, the cast of the bow is the cast of the bow.
If it has poor cast you will notice the trajectory being much more pronounced at longer ranges... anyhow, maybe I'm just being a pedant.
If it's a fibreglass back & belly, it's best left alone, whereas if it's a self wooden bow there are things you can do to speed it up a bit.
What weight arrows and what size fletching do you use? Maybe the arrows are too heavy, too fat and the fletchings may be too big.
Where do you anchor and what is your point on range?
What draw weight is the bow? Brace height? What is your draw length?... too short a draw may mean you aren't using the full potential of the bow?
Del
 


MBK

New member
Thanks for the reply Del.
I'm a field archer (NFAS) what is "point on range?"
I shoot AFB with a mediterranean loose, one above, two below. 45lb draw weight @ 28" although i only draw about 26"/27". I use 5/16" port orford cedar with 3" shield fletchings and 100 grain piles. My artows are all weight matched to within two or three grains when finished. (I make my own). I'm what we call an instinctive archer, I don't "aim" as such, I focus on the target.
I have tried smaller fletchings and cutting the fletchings to be slimmer. All that happens is that the arrows start to lose stability. When i mentioned cast, I assumed that was the "pushing force" of a bow. Once my arrows reach 25/30 yards, they just seem to drop from the sky, no gradual fall, just drop. They fly straight, that could be because of how fussy I am when I make them! I have thought of trying boyton pine which is apparently lighter or yellow cedar which is not only lighter still, but also much tighter grained.
In short, maybe just wait for my new bow? ;)
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
I shoot NFAS field.
IMO there are two ranges which we subconsciously (or consciously) relate to.
One is the zero to 10 yard sort of range (although it's surpising to know that an arrow actually drops about 8" over 10 yards!)
Two is Point On range. (Actually this is "Point Blank" range) The range at which if you line up the point of the arrow and the target (or a white marker disc, a "point blanc" ) the arrow hits the mark.
E.G At V short range (with an anchor point below eye level) the point of the arrow has to be placed below the target to hit it. Which is why some target archers use aiming markers on the ground. In the past these whould have been a white disc called a 'point blanc'
At V long range the point has to be above the target to hit it.
Thus at some specific distance, the point is on the target to hit it.
This range depends on the cast of the bow, the anchor point etc. Typically for my anchor and bow style it's about 30-40 yards.

It's a good catch question "what does point blank range mean?" most people assume it's zero... which may be true of a gun where you look down the barrel. But it's not true of a bow...
Hope this makes sense.
Del
BTW. There is a bit of an optical illusion whereby you think your arrow is going straight for the kill and then it just seems to die and go under the belly.
PS. Your arrows sound pretty sensible spec' to me (V similar to mine)
 


MBK

New member
Many thanks again Del. much appreciated. Perhaps I should stop being impatient and just wait for my new bow? ;)
Looking forward to this years 3D champs at Osmaston, hopefully the weather will be as glorious as last year! I somehow doubt it though!
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
If you consider your bow is effectively obsolete and want to experiment with it, I'd suggest taking 1.5" off each tip and re shaping the tips as per the original.
A fibreglass bow will have plenty of built in overdraw and as you aren't using the full draw anyway the bow will almost certainly be fine.
The only minor problem is F/glass isn't very kind to tools and will require good abrading/cleaning to glue on new tip overlays. When finished it will need sealing with some good varnish etc.
You should gain about 5# or so in draw weight and some extra cast, the lower tip mass will also help.
It could be a very interesting exercise, but only do it if you are happy to potentially scrap the bow.
Let us know if you try it.
Del
 


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