Advantages and Disadvantages of Height

Matblack

Member
Hi Everyone

I wanted to get some info on if there are any advantages or disadvantages of being tall and having a long draw length when shooting. I'm 6'3" and pretty substantial weight wise and having been doing my beginners course.

During the first week my coach had me using the second longest club arrows, this week, my second I was pulling them off the rest and we moved up to the longest arrows the club has, I'm not sure what length they are but there was a slight concern that as my draw increases I might be drawing these too far as well :scratchch

I am adament about staying with archery, I shot right till the end of the session this week and loved every moment of it but are there any long term implications to my size and draw? From what I've read limbs start to "stack" when over drawn? Will I find myself in this area or are there ways to buy bows whcih will draw further? Will I need a longer bow/ riser/ limbs, there do seem to a variation in limb and riser length is this what this is to compensate for?

Sorry for all the questions :shy:

MB
 

Erika

New member
Height is not always proportional to draw length. It's an excellent guide, but not set in stone.

Tim Cuddihy is about 6'1" and his draw length is only about 27". So mayhap you'll be lucky and you have short arms? :D

The gentlemen that I know to be around 6'3" tend to have issues with recurves. The limbs appear to fatigue very rapidly from over stress at a 33" draw.

If your wingspan is longer than your height... you're in trouble. I have not heard of any solutions to this issue. Perhaps you can get custom limbs made.
 

Munsterman

New member
If Hoty can make a bow for Shaquille O'Neal with his height/wingspan then anything is possible. :scratchch
 

Thunk

Well-known member
Ironman
I suspect you're currently shooting a training bow? Wooden riser with screw-on limbs?

If so, they are made to a price, and it shows. They're fine for beginners courses and a while after, but when you buy your own kit you'll be getting something of better quality. In particular, better quality limbs don't 'stack' in the way that cheap beginners limbs do. What draw weight are you currently pulling? And how long are those 'long' arrows?

Oh, and I'm at least an inch taller than you.
 
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Matblack

Member
If Hoty can make a bow for Shaquille O'Neal with his height/wingspan then anything is possible. :scratchch
If only I had his money :D

I'm not abnormally tall so Im sure something can be done without resorting to a custom made bow, at least I hope so, I don't have Shaq's fortune to buy a custom rig :(

MB
 

Matblack

Member
I suspect you're currently shoting a training bow? Wooden riser with screw-on limbs?

If so, they are made to a price, and it shows. They're fine for beginners courses and a while after, but when you buy your own kit you'll be getting something of better quality. In particular, better quality limbs don't 'stack' in the way that cheap beginners limbs do. What draw weight are you currently pulling? And how long are those 'long' arrows?
Yes it is a club training bow wooden with screw in limbs. It was a bit of a compromise really, the tallest bow didn't have a very heavy draw but we settled on it, its only 18# at its standard draw but I would say I am probably overdrawing it by a reasonable margin so I don't know what I have on the fingers.

I tried another beginners bow which was quoted at 26# and it didn't feel substantially different to me, which was a bit odd.

Its strange but some people seem to think there is something macho about draw weights, the other beginner was very keen for me try his bow, I think he thought I was going to tell him how hard it was and how amazingly strong he must be but it genuninely didn't feel that much different :D

They gave me the bow they gave me for a reason so if thats the one they think is best suited then I'll stick with it, its not about macho for me its about consistancy and form. But I am interested in if I should be looking at getting a longer bow or riser when I do start looking for equipment.

MB
 

Munsterman

New member
you can get 27 inch risers which can be paired with longer limbs to give you up to a 72 inch (AFAIK) bow. That should be plenty long for you. we had a 6.6 archer with gorilla arms who has no problem shooting 33 inch arrows
 

Matblack

Member
Sounds like I'll be able to find something to suit me which is cool, thanks for setting my mind at rest :)

MB
 

Yorker

New member
In standard terms you can get arrows up to 33" and then potentially extend the points to give you another half inch (although this is kinda dubious).

My draw is 25" exactly, my club vice captain is 7 inches shorter than me and draws the same!

You can always get a 27" riser and long limbs, making for a 72? inch bow.

If you are really troubled for draw length you can get Mongolian bows and longbows made to any draw length and make arrows as long as you want too.
 

Matblack

Member
A quick play with some string and a tape and I make my draw around 27-28". Obviously I'll have a better idea when I can get my coach to do a proper measurement but that seems about right :).

Ideally I really want to shoot recurve :)

MB
 

Bunsen

New member
Sounds like you are similar to me. 6' 3" with a very long draw. I didn't have too much trouble finding a bow. Look for long limbs. These will give you a 70" bow which should be OK. The only problem I had was in getting arrows that were long enough. " Beginner" ranges were OK but when I wanted to move up to carbons I was looking at full length arrows only just being long enough. In the end I " splashed the cash " and bought full length ACE,s.

At least I know which are my arrows in the boss, they stick out 6" further than everyone elses.http://www.archery-interchange.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif
Talking
 

Hidden Hippo

New member
I think if you were really desparate (read: gorilla with 33"+ draw) you could even make a 74" bow with extra long Border limbs and a 27" riser.

If you're around the 27/28" mark then you're probably about average in terms of draw length.
 

Matblack

Member
Actually I think after abit of experiementation it might be a little longer than that :D but its not going to be more than 30" I wouldn't have thought. That seems to mean that I won't be restricted when I do come to make a purchase and could start off with less expensive riser like a Winstar II or similar and long limbs which is good because I'm not made of money :D

MB
 

Thunk

Well-known member
Ironman
A quick play with some string and a tape and I make my draw around 27-28". Obviously I'll have a better idea when I can get my coach to do a proper measurement but that seems about right :).

Ideally I really want to shoot recurve :)

MB
No problem at all.

You will need a 25" riser with long limbs. (27" risers are OK, but they are only made by one or two manufacturers and then you have to get strings specially made etc etc.)

I'm 6 feet 4 inches. I shoot with a 25" riser, long limbs, and my arrows are 30" - cut down from the standard 33" length. No problem at all.

You are right to consign macho ideas of draw weight to the dustbin. People who pull the absolute limit of their ability are making it much harder for themselves to establish good form. If what you are shooting at the moment helps you towards that then it's doing its job. Take care when you go to buy your own kit though; you will need something rather heavier than you are currently using, but going for too much of a weight increase in one go can cause problems. Make sure you buy from a reputable archery shop (not online) and take their advice about what to go for. If your club coach or an experienced archer can go with you, so much the better. And make sure you try before you buy, remembering that whilst a big increase in weight can feel quite manageable for a few test shots, shooting a round is going to involve several dozen shots plus sighters, and if the weight you have selected is too great an increase you will find your form collapsing as your muscles tire.

Help and advice is always available on AIUK!
 

Mistake

New member
Ironman
Actually I think after abit of experiementation it might be a little longer than that :D but its not going to be more than 30" I wouldn't have thought. That seems to mean that I won't be restricted when I do come to make a purchase and could start off with less expensive riser like a Winstar II or similar and long limbs which is good because I'm not made of money :D

MB
Your max drawlength may not be the most stable one for you. I'm basically 6 foot 2 (just a little under) and i have a draw length of about 28 3/4 to the button (never taken the time to messure it to the button.. normally to the back of the riser). I can, however, draw 30.5 inch arrows over the back of the arrow rest if i want to, but i'm not stable whilst doing it
 

Matblack

Member
No problem at all.

You will need a 25" riser with long limbs. (27" risers are OK, but they are only made by one or two manufacturers and then you have to get strings specially made etc etc.)

I'm 6 feet 4 inches. I shoot with a 25" riser, long limbs, and my arrows are 30" - cut down from the standard 33" length. No problem at all.

You are right to consign macho ideas of draw weight to the dustbin. People who pull the absolute limit of their ability are making it much harder for themselves to establish good form. If what you are shooting at the moment helps you towards that then it's doing its job. Take care when you go to buy your own kit though; you will need something rather heavier than you are currently using, but going for too much of a weight increase in one go can cause problems. Make sure you buy from a reputable archery shop (not online) and take their advice about what to go for. If your club coach or an experienced archer can go with you, so much the better. And make sure you try before you buy, remembering that whilst a big increase in weight can feel quite manageable for a few test shots, shooting a round is going to involve several dozen shots plus sighters, and if the weight you have selected is too great an increase you will find your form collapsing as your muscles tire.

Help and advice is always available on AIUK!
Thanks for that it sounds like excellent advice, This place is certainly a library of knowledge and people seem really happy to help which is excellent, I know thatthe chap running my beginers course is a member here and specifcally recomended this site because of the quality of advice :)

I will most definately be visting a shop when the time comes to buy my kit, I have friends who are based in Braintree, so a visit to the shop up there is probably on the cards as it seems one of the closest to me and we can see them afterwards. But of course however temping I won't be doing this until after I finish my beginers course :shy:

Thanks for the info regarding limbs, it seems like a bit of a lottery when you choose your first set and then you can refine once you settle into them so I think I'll go for the cheapest when I do buy my own kit and then use that as a reference point buying some more expensive ones probably later in the year which are closer to my ideal draw weight.

Thanks again

MB
 

Thunk

Well-known member
Ironman
Thanks for that it sounds like excellent advice, This place is certainly a library of knowledge and people seem really happy to help which is excellent, I know thatthe chap running my beginers course is a member here and specifcally recomended this site because of the quality of advice :)

I will most definately be visting a shop when the time comes to buy my kit, I have friends who are based in Braintree, so a visit to the shop up there is probably on the cards as it seems one of the closest to me and we can see them afterwards. But of course however temping I won't be doing this until after I finish my beginers course :shy:

Thanks for the info regarding limbs, it seems like a bit of a lottery when you choose your first set and then you can refine once you settle into them so I think I'll go for the cheapest when I do buy my own kit and then use that as a reference point buying some more expensive ones probably later in the year which are closer to my ideal draw weight.

Thanks again

MB
If it's Braintree it must be Perris. They have a very good reputation and will serve you well. Note that Whitehart of this forum is Perris!
 
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its my party and

Active member
Ironman
I think you sound like a sensible beginner Matt so Id say wait a few more weeks or possible more. Borrow the clubs equipment and get some more advice from the coach as you progress and maybe shoot some more arrows and then decide what kit your going to get. Have a measure up with the coach before you go and then go armed with the right information, or even ask your coach to go with you and some of the other beginners! This period of waiting may just have allowed you to settle into a more regular draw, and if it hasn't I suppose you could always borrow the clubs arrows until your coach decides you have a regular draw length. Good luck and good shooting.
 

Matblack

Member
Well I've been shooting today for the first time in two weeks and really enjoyed it, things are coming together and I've progressed to the 50yd targets. People seemed quite surprised that I was shooting 50yds with 18lb limbs and the club Jazz arrows :D.

However thats going to be the full extent of the distance possible with this bow, the sight is about as low as is going to work without shooting the flights off the arrows and I feel ready to progress to a higher poundage, I'd also like my own riser and limbs soon, so I wondered what people would recommend as a progression? I'm thinking a 25" riser with some cheapish long limbs and starting with maybe 24lbs, does that seem a little low for a big guy? If they aren't going to stack like the club bow is stacking then maybe something a little higher?

Riser wise I saw one in the classifieds here which looks like it would work all the way up to 100yds, a Merlin Elite, does that sound like a reasonable idea? I'm trying to do this on a budget so I want to make some savings somewhere, maybe then go to a shop and get suitable limbs pay the shop price and get them to set up the limbs on my riser supplying a string and arrows too.

What do you guys think?

Thanks in advance

Matt
 

Thunk

Well-known member
Ironman
Well I've been shooting today for the first time in two weeks and really enjoyed it, things are coming together and I've progressed to the 50yd targets. People seemed quite surprised that I was shooting 50yds with 18lb limbs and the club Jazz arrows :D.

However thats going to be the full extent of the distance possible with this bow, the sight is about as low as is going to work without shooting the flights off the arrows and I feel ready to progress to a higher poundage, I'd also like my own riser and limbs soon, so I wondered what people would recommend as a progression? I'm thinking a 25" riser with some cheapish long limbs and starting with maybe 24lbs, does that seem a little low for a big guy? If they aren't going to stack like the club bow is stacking then maybe something a little higher?

Riser wise I saw one in the classifieds here which looks like it would work all the way up to 100yds, a Merlin Elite, does that sound like a reasonable idea? I'm trying to do this on a budget so I want to make some savings somewhere, maybe then go to a shop and get suitable limbs pay the shop price and get them to set up the limbs on my riser supplying a string and arrows too.

What do you guys think?

Thanks in advance

Matt
The Elite is a very good riser - in terms of quality it could take you to the Olympics. But choosing a bow is a very subjective thing - what suits one person is totally wrong in feel for another. So my advice would be to go to a good shop and give them an idea of how much you want to spend. They will sort out some different bows to choose from and which you can try on their range.

Your idea of buying a good riser and cheapish limbs is a good one. If you like the feel of a particular riser in your hand you will probably keep it for a good while. Limbs will change as you develop your strength - some shops sell cheapish limbs like KAP Challenger and offer a limb exchange deal whereby you can change the ones you've got for a higher poundage every six months or so. But do try before you buy to ensure that what you end up with is going to serve you well.
 
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