Aiming

erehwon

New member
Apologies in advance if this sound stupid, I am a beginner and have not shot many arrows, I am teaching myself as the nearest club is a 3 hour drive away. I am currently shooting from around 10 metres after working backwards from 5 metres, I shoot of the shelf with no sighting aids and normally can place a good grouping on an A4 sized piece of paper (when happy with this I switch to using a margarine tub lid as a target before stepping back again). I currently aim by putting my arrow tip on the target centre then adjusting by lowering the arrow tip and moving it slightly to the right before releasing, it works for me but just wanting to check if this sounds correct (I hope I have explained it properly).

Thanks
 

ben tarrow

Well-known member
What you do with the front end of the arrow depends on what you do with the back end of the arrow.
A good consistent "anchor" is important. Can you describe how you locate your drawing hand on your face?
 

erehwon

New member
What you do with the front end of the arrow depends on what you do with the back end of the arrow.
A good consistent "anchor" is important. Can you describe how you locate your drawing hand on your face?
Drawing hand comes back to rear of jaw bone, tried various anchor points but this is the most comfortable for me.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
As the title is aiming, I think it is worth mentioning the string blur that you see when at full draw. The anchor that Ben mentioned is vital; and the string blur is one way of checking how consistent you are being with that anchoring. Once you find out where the string appears in relation to the arrow or the bow, that position should repeat.
As you start to shoot further, the need to point the arrow below the target, will change and aiming "at the target" will happen at a certain distance. Shooting further than that will require you to aim above the target.
Another aiming option is the hold the string with the fingers placed in different positions. If you put all three fingers under the arrow and shoot, you will find the arrows go lower than with one finger above and two below.
 

erehwon

New member
As the title is aiming, I think it is worth mentioning the string blur that you see when at full draw. The anchor that Ben mentioned is vital; and the string blur is one way of checking how consistent you are being with that anchoring. Once you find out where the string appears in relation to the arrow or the bow, that position should repeat..
Okay you lost me on that one, off the read up on string blur and what it is!

As you start to shoot further, the need to point the arrow below the target, will change and aiming "at the target" will happen at a certain distance. Shooting further than that will require you to aim above the target..
Noticed this as I started off shooting at 5 metres so have had to adjust as I have moved back.

Another aiming option is the hold the string with the fingers placed in different positions. If you put all three fingers under the arrow and shoot, you will find the arrows go lower than with one finger above and two below.
Just went out and tried both methods to see the difference as have always shot with three fingers under the arrow, unexpected difference in arrow height.

Thanks for the help
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
If you watch videos of most archers, at full draw, the string actually touches their nose and chin. If you hold up your index finger to touch your chin and nose, and slide the finger higher( but not up inside the nostril.heehee) you will see the finger end as a blur. If you close one eye at a time, you will see the blur with each eye. With both eyes open you may see two blurs.
With your draw you are probably going to see the string blur, too. More likely if your string touches your nose at full draw. If your string touches the side of your nose rather than the end of it, the string will be very close to your eye and appear very blurred and even wider than drawing to the end of the nose.
There will probably be a point where the string blur fades out to nothing, and you can see clearly past it. That is easier to see if you close the eye you are not using for aiming.
For many archers who draw with their right hand, the left hand side of the string blur appears very close to their arrow; and close to their sight if they use one. The position of the blur( where it fades to nothing) should be in the same place each shot, in relation to the arrow. Some archers find it easier to judge the position in relation to their sight, if they have one. Some find the blur is too far from arrow or sight, so they see it in relation to the riser. One side or the other ,usually.
 

erehwon

New member
Thanks for the explanation, managed the index finger on the chin and nose bit without injury though my partner found it highly amusing and thought I had lost the plot :laughing::laughing:

My anchor point is under my jaw bone as I find this extremely comfortable when shooting, I will check for the string blur when shooting tomorrow, something else learned, thanks for taking the time to reply.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Heehee, I can see the reasoning behind the lost plot.
Next time, just modify the gesture by making a Shhhhh! sound and explain that you were listening for tinnitus.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
People are making assumptions based on target archery.
String blur???? Why would you even be able to see the string?
Ah, they assume that it's in front of your eye because you are drawing to chin or relatively short and you have the bow vertical!
There is no reason at all to hold a bow vertical... unless you have sights! :shocked:
There are plenty of reasons to hold it at an angle :) !
Sounds to me like you are doing fine.
You said the magic word "comfortable"... good for you.
By all means listen to all the advice, but only take on board that which fits in with how and why you are shooting the bow.
Not everyone is a target archer.... there are plenty of other disciplines.
Personally I anchor with the V of thumb and forefinger tucked behind the angle of my jaw and the bow canted (tilted) over a about 30 degrees)
Del
 

erehwon

New member
There is no reason at all to hold a bow vertical... unless you have sights! :shocked:
There are plenty of reasons to hold it at an angle :) !
Thanks for the comments Del, appreciated, I just intend to keep things simple, bow, string and arrows and see where I end up. Strangely I do cant my bow slightly when shooting but as to the angle I have no idea as I just hold it where it feels natural and do what works for me but am always willing try something different just see the effect it has on my shooting and to expand my extremely limited knowledge. Long term I dream of being able to afford a decent one piece wooden bow that I can take out camping and shoot a few arrows over a decent distance and actually hit a small target bag or similar, sounds a bit Robin Hoodish but I have never really grown up!

Thanks again everyone for replies and pointers.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Thanks for the comments Del, appreciated, I just intend to keep things simple, bow, string and arrows and see where I end up. Strangely I do cant my bow slightly when shooting but as to the angle I have no idea as I just hold it where it feels natural and do what works for me but am always willing try something different just see the effect it has on my shooting and to expand my extremely limited knowledge. Long term I dream of being able to afford a decent one piece wooden bow that I can take out camping and shoot a few arrows over a decent distance and actually hit a small target bag or similar, sounds a bit Robin Hoodish but I have never really grown up!

Thanks again everyone for replies and pointers.
We're all a bit Robin Hoodish at heart.
It took me many years to find a decent bit of Yew and make my first good longbow. Made plenty since then :)
If you feel the urge, a simple bow made from Hazel cut yourself and seasoned in a month (in this hot weather) can be intensely satisfying but we warned making bows can be addictive :)
Del
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Being Robin Hoodish is good, I feel. Never growing up is good ,too.
I think that doing something, like archery; just because we like doing it, is rather child like. Children do things that they like doing, sometimes/often for reasons they cannot explain. Doing those things just makes them happy. If they are running around they often giggle as they go, running makes them happy.
Archery can make us feel happy, from the first shots we make. Hitting a target of any sort can make us feel happy, too, but in a different way. It's like two happys; making the happy shot and then seeing the happy ending. If you do that with a bow you made yourself, you could have three happys for the price of one. Great value is it not?
Keeping a hold of that child like enjoyment seems to be hard work for some. Perhaps it is easier for those who grow up very slowly.
My wife is getting me a pelican bib for my next birthday.
 

jerryRTD

Well-known member
People are making assumptions based on target archery.
String blur???? Why would you even be able to see the string?
Del
When I shoot bare bow (don't laugh I do occasionally) index finger in the corner of the mouth and index knuckle under the cheek bone anchor puts the string in front of my eye. So why would you even be able to see the string. 'Because it's there'
 
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Del the Cat

Well-known member
When I shoot bare bow (don't laugh I do occasionally) index finger in the corner of the mouth and index knuckle under the cheek bone anchor puts the string in front of my eye. So why would you even be able to see the string. 'Because it's there'
Yes for YOUR anchor... sheesh..
I explained it perfectly adequately in my original post, if you read past the point where your hackles rise!
Del
 

ben tarrow

Well-known member
Yes for YOUR anchor... sheesh..
I explained it perfectly adequately in my original post, if you read past the point where your hackles rise!
Del
Equally, "Yes, for YOUR anchor, Dell"
There are many ways to shoot, many of which are as good as any other. Thats why I was trying to get a bit more info on how the OP is trying to shoot, rather than just bombard him with the "the way I do it is this, so that must be the best way"
replies.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Thanks for that Ben...
But.
a) My response wasn't to you.
b) That's exactly what I expressed in my original post.
c) Reiterating that which has already been stated constitutes argument nor discussion.
d) Zymurgy
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
This is a case of the three wrotes.
This is what I think I wrote.
This is what I actually wrote.
This is what I should have wrote.
 

ben tarrow

Well-known member
Thanks for that Ben...
But.
a) My response wasn't to you.
b) That's exactly what I expressed in my original post.
c) Reiterating that which has already been stated constitutes argument nor discussion.
d) Zymurgy
Hi Dell,
(a)I know
(b)I know
(c) I think that should be "neither argument nor discussion", but since I was reiterating my attempts to ascertain how the OP was shooting with a forward intention to ask what he wanted to achieve, I feel that contributed to the discussion

(d) Whats fermentation got to do with it? (I had to google Zymurgy)
 
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