Arrow rests - your thoughts

Mark31121

Member
Ironman
You'd be surprised how much you can tighten the rest of the serving and it's quite easy to move up or down.
 

dfrois

Supporter
Supporter
A single upper nock point, with an archer that puts most of the force on the middle finger (as it should be) makes up a situation where the arrow will have a strong tendency to climb down the string on launch. The only thing preventing it is arrow nock friction on the string. Or, the middle finger has to be so tight against the arrow that it can not slide down. That, of course, brings other problems...

Good to know you fixed it.

DF
 

Ar-Pe-Lo

New member
Now that I've found the correct position, I've already stripped off the temporary nocking points and serving and re-done it with the Beiter one. I might have to re-tune slightly, but it shouldn't be by much.

I can't imagine moving the serving and the Beiter NP, the serving is on really tight, that thing's going nowhere!!
I use beiter NP for years and moving serving with BH gauge (about 5mm of serving each time) without any problems.
 

ajh499

Member
It looks like I spoke too soon!

I have still be getting shaft to rest contact, even after changing the nocking point. The contact was much more intermittent and it had moved from being about a third of the way up the side of the shaft, to being almost directly underneath. So the arrow wasn't dropping as low (presumably due to not sliding down from the nocking point), but it was still making some contact.

After a evening of fiddling around with things I found the solution - increasing the tiller seems to have fixed the problem.
I'm not 100% sure of why this should be, I guess that by weakening the top limb, relative to the bottom, the bottom limb moves further forward relative to the top limb.
I guess that prevents the back of the arrow from being pushed down by the top limb leading the bottom.

I don't know, just a guess, but it certainly worked.

I had been shooting with a tiller of about 0 to 2mm while fiddling trying to eliminate this contact. I've now set it to +6mm and it seems to have worked.

Not sure if it's relevant, but by setting tiller to 0, then putting the limbs on upside down, I got a +6mm tiller. So I guess that makes the "natural" tiller of the limbs -3mm (whatever that means)
 

Senlac

Supporter
Supporter
Re putting the limbs on upside down and getting a different tiller, this means the two limbs are different. I assume one will be marked "Upper", the other "Lower". The point is this means they are constructed with different poundages so that, when installed the right way up, they should be about right with 0mm tiller (i.e. the tiller measurement top & bottom will be the same, but in fact the two limbs have inbuilt tiller). So that's the base position ex-manufacture. You can shoot them with 0mm tiller and they should work well. If you them apply 2mm or 6mm tiller you are in fact applying additional tiller, beyond that normally needed to get the two limbs to act in unison.
 

Timid Toad

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
Ironman
Re putting the limbs on upside down and getting a different tiller, this means the two limbs are different. I assume one will be marked "Upper", the other "Lower". The point is this means they are constructed with different poundages so that, when installed the right way up, they should be about right with 0mm tiller (i.e. the tiller measurement top & bottom will be the same, but in fact the two limbs have inbuilt tiller). So that's the base position ex-manufacture. You can shoot them with 0mm tiller and they should work well. If you them apply 2mm or 6mm tiller you are in fact applying additional tiller, beyond that normally needed to get the two limbs to act in unison.
Slightly incorrect. With inbuilt tiller, if you set top and bolts the same number of turns out the two limbs should balance showing a positive tiller. Usually between 2-6mm. If you set the tiller to zero, you will get some funny results as you are negating the inbuilt tiller.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Not sure if it's relevant, but by setting tiller to 0, then putting the limbs on upside down, I got a +6mm tiller. So I guess that makes the "natural" tiller of the limbs -3mm (whatever that means)
If the riser pockets are at the same angle to the string as each other, and the limbs are identical, you get a sort of symmetry, yes?
If you swap the limbs, the symmetry remains, it's just like turning the bow upide down.( except for the grip part.
If you have one limb stiffer than the other and you fit them into a symetrical riser( pockets at same angle to the string) then 3mm shorter at the bottom could possibly be the natural tiller. Put the limbs in upside down and if the same 3mm tiller appears at the top, that 3mm is the natural tiller.
So natural tiller could be described as the tiller that shows when the pockets are symmetrically set.
It could be 0 if both limbs are identical, and upside down would be 0 too.
Rik's formula can be used to test for natural tiller and also to find out if the limb pockets have been set to identical settings or if one has got adjusted out of sync with the other, as could happen if you lost count of the turns, or went the wrong way by mistake.
 

Senlac

Supporter
Supporter
Slightly incorrect. With inbuilt tiller, if you set top and bolts the same number of turns out the two limbs should balance showing a positive tiller. Usually between 2-6mm. If you set the tiller to zero, you will get some funny results as you are negating the inbuilt tiller.
I should have mentioned that what I was saying was with the limb bolts at exactly the same turns.
But here I am, with two sets of W&W Inno Max limbs, on near identical W&W risers with the bolts set identically in/out, with the Upper and Lower limbs in the correct ends, the tiller is zero on both bows. I'm currently leaving it there, the arrows shoot sweetly straight and the bows are quiet. Nocking point 3mm above centre line. No funny results I can see.
 
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