[Horsebow] Asiatic Bow Guidance?..

Washiington

New member
Hi all

I?m interesting in learning how to shoot an Asiatic bow/horse bow and wondered if I could get a few pointers please. I shoot bare bow recurve currently, and want to learn to shoot the horsebow using a thumb ring in a traditional style ( I appreciate there are many styles :). I?ll be horse free however heh.

Are there any recommended dvds/books/styles that would help me on my journey?
I was thinking about buying a Groser Old Scythian Bow to start with as they nicely priced, and I have seen in another thread that the Kaya bow comes recommended too? I could then upgrade to a more expensive bow as I learn more. My recurve is 34 lbs, but thought maybe 30lbs for the horse bow to help with getting the technique correct. Plus, I?ll be drawing more than my usual 28??.

As I wear glasses, are there any styles that traditionally don?t draw too far back? Someof the clips I have seen look like the release would knock my glasses off lol.


Any advice to get me started on the right path would be great, thanks. I?m in the UK btw, and a member of a target archery club (which would be it's use at the mo).


Thanks
 


blakey

Active member
Hi all

I’m interesting in learning how to shoot an Asiatic bow/horse bow and wondered if I could get a few pointers please. I shoot bare bow recurve currently, and want to learn to shoot the horsebow using a thumb ring in a traditional style ( I appreciate there are many styles :). I’ll be horse free however heh.

Are there any recommended dvds/books/styles that would help me on my journey?
I was thinking about buying a Groser Old Scythian Bow to start with as they nicely priced, and I have seen in another thread that the Kaya bow comes recommended too… I could then upgrade to a more expensive bow as I learn more. My recurve is 34 lbs, but thought maybe 30lbs for the horse bow to help with getting the technique correct. Plus, I’ll be drawing more than my usual 28’’.

As I wear glasses, are there any styles that traditionally don’t draw too far back? Someof the clips I have seen look like the release would knock my glasses off lol.


Any advice to get me started on the right path would be great, thanks. I’m in the UK btw, and a member of a target archery club (which would be it's use at the mo).


Thanks
Hey Washy, I too shoot barebow recurve and play around with a horsebow (Samick SKB) sometimes. I've found great difficulty shooting with a thumbring anywhere near my usual draw weight. (SKB is 50 lbs). I would recommend starting with a thumbring on a light bow (any type) of about 20 lbs and play around for a while before you buy anything. I also wear glasses and never have a prob but then I draw back to a corner mouth anchor. I think if you intend to draw back past the ear you will want to get a very high quality horsebow with a draw length of at least 32". Beware that some of the cheaper ones do not draw this far. Of course you don't have to draw out to the ear. But as I understand it the long ear draw helps you get your eyeline inside the bow, which helps with aiming because the arrow is on the opposite side with a thumbring. If you don't draw long, the bow handle obscures the target. Which probably explains why I shoot like crap with my SKB? At the moment on Ebay Australia the Chinese are knocking out horsebows for $55! They look to be a similar quality to the bottom range Hungarians. Here's a link to some real experts: YouTube Num Sum http://youtu.be/VLiUu_nzT0g
There's also lots of real experts on this forum, and hopefully some of them will chime in and correct any misleading statements I've made. Have fun, Cheers
Talk about misleading statements, I've just watched the clip again myself, and have realised that the Mongols are shooting Righthanded off the left side of the bow! Which is the opposite of what I've been doing (or trying) for years! Where on earth did I get that advice from? Just goes to show how dangerous amateur info can be! Looks like I should be shooting off the same side as with Med release. I can't wait for Saturday now. Perhaps I'll be able to finally hit the target?
P.S From the vid it does look as tho both of us would lose our specs with the long draw?
 


blakey

Active member
Got myself totally intrigued and confused now? Here's another link: YouTube - ‪Use of Thumb Ring in traditional archery‬‏ This is Hungarians (Poles?) shooting off the right side of the bow with a thumbring? I've been playing downstairs with my SKB, and cannot for the life of me get the arrow to sit on the left with a thumbring without falling away and off the knuckle to the left. Yet the Mongols are doing it? I've been trying to analyse their release position. Knuckles parallel to the ground and twisting hand anti-clockwise into the bow? Any advice/thoughts really appreciated. cheers
 


Dorset Lass

New member
Ironman
Hi Blakey
Sorry I have not piped up on this thread sooner! I have just read 'Kay's Thumbring Book' - a small spiral bound number which is packed with a wealth of information about thumb rings and the different techniques for shooting with them. I got my copy from Sylvan Archery in the UK:

Introduction to Sylvan Archery

I have just looked on their website to get the URL and I see it is no longer listed so not sure if they still have copies. If you can get hold of one I highly recommend it.

In the book it is explained that due to the paradox it is best to start out shooting with the arrow on the right side of the bow when using a thumb release, however once archers are very experienced they are able to loose an arrow with the minimum of paradox and then it no longer matters whether they use the right or the left side of the bow. Well it is most definitely the right side for me!

I have found that with perseverance you can get good results, especially if you don't rely completely on the strength in your thumb do hold back the string. The fingers should be tensed and this strengthens the tendons on the thumb. With the fingers locked around the thumb you have more stability and strength. Also the bow arm should be relaxed and bent - not straight. A bit of string torque with the release hand twisting inwards towards the bow and the bow canted towards the right (for a right handed archer) is helpful.
 


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