Binoculars for field target

KidCurry

Active member
I own some Opticron 10x25 which are excellent but cost over £200. If I was buying again I would go for the Nikon Travelite EX 8x25 or 10x25. They are outstanding value, very good quality, good glass across the whole field of view, waterproof and nitrogen filled, 10 yr guarantee. My brother owns some 10x25 and I find them excellent right up to, and including, 100 yds. They can be found for less than £100. Make sure they are the fully armored version. John lewis sell them for £99.95 but they can be found cheaper.
 


robert43

Member
What ever you get make sure they are BAK4 type I use cheap Scokc 10 x 42 I had a better pair for get the brand they cost about $400 Oz & these cost about $100 Oz & I cant see the difference & field is all I shoot as no target clubs under 3hrs away & my clubs about 15 mins away
 


Emmadragon

Supporter
Supporter
I got a Gillo monocular for Christmas, and it's actually really good, especially for the price (around £40). I was very pleasantly surprised when I used it recently. Perris Archery was the supplier, I think.
 


Geophys

Member
I tried various binoculars for field archery. problem was that any that were really good at light gathering in the woods were quite bulky. After a trip to the USA where I got to talk to a number of bow hunters they all without exception said that they used a monocular. Their monocular of choice seemed to be the Vortex 10x36, I found one on amazon. They are not cheap, but are great in woodland shooting. image quality and light gathering are superb. If I lost this one I'd get another one in a shot.

 


Kernowlad

Member
I tried various binoculars for field archery. problem was that any that were really good at light gathering in the woods were quite bulky. After a trip to the USA where I got to talk to a number of bow hunters they all without exception said that they used a monocular. Their monocular of choice seemed to be the Vortex 10x36, I found one on amazon. They are not cheap, but are great in woodland shooting. image quality and light gathering are superb. If I lost this one I'd get another one in a shot.

Looks good; I may have to buy one...
 


fbirder

Supporter
Supporter
I tried various binoculars for field archery. problem was that any that were really good at light gathering in the woods were quite bulky. After a trip to the USA where I got to talk to a number of bow hunters they all without exception said that they used a monocular. Their monocular of choice seemed to be the Vortex 10x36, I found one on amazon. They are not cheap, but are great in woodland shooting. image quality and light gathering are superb. If I lost this one I'd get another one in a shot.

The problem I can see with them is that 10x36 will not give a very bright image. 10x50 will give an image that is twice as bright, but then you're looking at 50% extra weight (compared to the Barr & Stroud 10x50 Sprite Monocular).
 


Geophys

Member
I have found that they give very good light transmission. It's the quality and coatings of the glass that makes the difference, it's also what contributes to the relatively higher price. Do not assume that the 10x50 from one maker will transmit more light than the 10x36 from another. I have used these Vortex 10x36 now for 2 years of field shooting and as I said would by another one in an instant. I'm afraid with optics you do get what you pay for. They are certainly the equal of any 10x50 I have looked through that was under £300. One of my club mates had the B&S 10x50 and it didn't compare to the Vortex for image quality, he now has one these instead.
 


Top