Bow Hand/Riser Centerline Angle

Frank Lawler

New member
Hello All,
One can always find a discussion concerning the angle of the bow hand knuckles w/respect to the riser, but I have never found one concerning the angle made by the hand w/respect to the riser's centerline, that is, the orientation of bow hand on riser if viewed from directly overhead. I would appreciate hearing any observations on this topic. It is of particular interest to me as recently I have suspected that my bow hand is too much on the riser's centerline, forcing my wrist to flex backwards to restore alignment. Thanks.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Viewed from above,the hand fits into the grip rather like a V facing forwards,fingers one side and thumb on the other.The centreline of the bow will probably have the centreline of the bow grip on the same plane, and the part of the grip that is deepest into the V of the hand.If you use the view from above and consider the arrow to be more or less on that centreline, it is possible to imagine the force into the hand, from the drawn bow, following the same line as the arrow. If the hand is moved by bending at the wrist, it is possible the have the force line( as described by the line of the arrow) cutting the wrist in different places. If you hold the bow in the left hand and bend the wrist a lot so the palm faces you, the force line cuts across the thumb. If you bend the wrist the other way so the palm faces away from you, the line cuts somewhere down the forearm.Most of what I have read and what I try to do, is get the hand positioned so the force line cuts the end of the forearm bone that is closer to the thumb.( radius bone)
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
The force line cannot go straight down the bow arm. The arm is to one side of the force line, at the bow shoulder.
If you follow the force line back from the bow grip it should cut the radius bone and then run into thin air.If that line misses the radius, the force tries to pull the thumb away from the rest of the hand!! If the line goes too far the other way, there is a lot of bone on the inside of the bow and the string could give the arm a nasty bang.
The Draw Force Line is a line that goes from bow hand to string hand and continues straight on to the draw elbow, so that forearm has the force line running through it; or is an extension of it when the archer's draw arm is aligned.Perhaps you were thinking of that?
When the bow hand is positioned as I described, there should be little or no tendency for the wrist to bend one way or the other; it is almost "at Rest".
Sometimes the bow grip is shaped in such a way that some hands want to turn even when they seem to be positioned correctly. I feel the grip shape should support the hand when it is placed correctly; if it doesn't, I get busy re shaping it.Some buy special grips.
 

Frank Lawler

New member
No, not referring to draw side forearm, but think I've got it now! Grip is comfortably shaped (epoxy, sandpaper, repeat several times), so it must be a matter of breaking a year-old habit. Will search for a position that minimizes wrist tension. Thanks very much.
 
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