Broken Wooden Arrows

Timid Toad

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Yup. I shot in an International with someone else's name on last year. They were second hand arrows and the name was on with indelible ink but perfectly serviceable. No problems at all.
 

Geophys2

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I thought it was just identification to prove they are your arrows for scoring in case 2 people have identical arrows - not necessarily your name.
I should have said some UK organisations. The NFAS does, in its rules, specifically require arrows to have the archers name, which must be a minimum of the surname and initials. AGB needs them to be identifiable, however all three of the AGB clubs I have belonged to also required a name on all arrows so as to identify any stray arrows found on the field, all of the clubs used shared fields and it was important to know who had left an unreported lost arrow on the field. This was also an entry requirement for our open shoots for the same reason.
 

Timid Toad

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Our club just requires you to be able to identify them as yours if found, reported or otherwise. Requiring actual names implies you've had honesty issues at your club in the past, Geophys2?
 

Geophys2

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Our club just requires you to be able to identify them as yours if found, reported or otherwise. Requiring actual names implies you've had honesty issues at your club in the past, Geophys2?
No, not the case at all, as I said we used shared fields, so it was a rule that all arrow must be found before leaving the field, this applied to open shoots as well. Two of the clubs were on rugby fields and the other the primary school, if one of the children found an arrow on the field or one of the rugby players had been injured by a lost arrow we needed to know whose it was without having to put it on display and ask. This was particularly true after open shoots with archers whose arrows we might not recognise, in fact we never had an issue with our own members as the only times it happened were with archers from other clubs. There are important safety issues to leaving arrows on shared fields, so identification of who had left an arrow unreported on our field was important.
 

Timid Toad

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We have the same rules, but only require that they can be identified.
 

Geophys2

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We have the same rules, but only require that they can be identified.
That's how we did it originally and works fine within the club, however after one of our open shoots the children found two arrows on the playing field and we nearly lost use of the field, it took a great deal of grovelling with the governors to let us continue to shoot, part of the agreement was that all arrows should be identifiable to the archer, so that any disciplinary action could be taken for failure to report a lost arrow. I can see no valid reason as to why any archer would object to having their name on their arrows.
 

Berny

Member
i'd look at 11/32" POC or .....
....when i tried spruce they most broke in 1 shoot 424467_243273155759501_1815636009_n[1].jpg

so i tried pine, maple & assorted others including tonkin boos depending on bow used & governing body shot under.
Most robust were the boos, but even they pretty much all broke (~200 shafts total).

Casualty rates got better as my shooting got better!
 
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