Cheap carbon arrows, and other beginner questions.

Celtic Boar

New member
Hi,

I've had a looksie through the site and seen the advice, 'dont buy cheap carbon arrows, try and find brand names, a bit cheaper'

However, I saw THIS WEBSITE, which suggests THESE CARBON ARROWS are good value?

[However I can never find the GPI on chinese cheap carbon arrows for sale.]

How Do I judge whether they are right for my set up? 43lb barebow, wooden riser with felt shelf, 60"?

Im not sure whether I am asking the right questions here, as I have been mainly shooting aluminium xx75 gamegetters 500 spine, before recently buying some carbon easton powerflight 500 spine, and carbon easton axis traditional arrows, 500 spine.

Why is it important to increase kinetic energy?

And what does, to increase kinetic energy, an arrow needs overall mass mean?

I would like to shoot further with my carbon arrows as I have been shooting at 30 yards predominantly with the 500 spine ally gamegetters.

But I dont understand the hows and why the significance of the weight means?

I read somewhere that an arrow weighing 450 grain is a good choice? Why? This referring to the overall weight of what?

I must be doing this wrong, but if i add my easton axis traditional at 8.6gpi x 30.75" = 264.45 [grains?]

Plus 100 grain points is 364.45.......

That cant be right. How do you work this out and why is it important?

Does anyone have a link or two I can make sense of to show me how this is worked out?

Thanks, confused...
 


Timid Toad

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Ok. The review you cite is a paid review. I would never trust a site saying fibreglass arrows are suitable for any recurve.
If you live in the UK you won't be hunting anyway, so looking for advice on hunting websites is only going to cause you problems. Mass required for killing an animal at 20yds max is different to mass required for getting an arrow to a target at 70m.
For now I'd suggest reading as much as possible in the *target* section of Easton's arrow website. While other options are available, you need to get your head round some fundamentals of shooting before getting overly into a few grains here or there.
I would put your bow type into their shaft selector, along with draw length and poundage *on the fingers* not marked on the bow and look at their recommendations. I would invest in a set of the cheaper shafts, or look on Ebay for some second hand ones that exactly fit the shaft selector's recommendations. Follow their suggestions for points and nocks, and go from there.
Then you are going to need to tune. And that's a whole different ball game.....
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Cheap carbon arrows can be a pain. Some are not straight enough and some grounds do not allow all carbon arrows to be shot because of the dangers they pose as they can be very difficult to find, as metal detectors only react to the metal piles.
I have seen new archers bring in their cheap carbon arrows, and they are usually made from carbon or fiberglass tubes that were never intended for arrows.
As for kinetic energy, that is really important for bow hunters as it is a measure of the arrows "stopping " power or killing power; they don't want to shoot an animal and just give it a nasty injury. A low kinetic energy doesn't give the arrow enough power to make a clean kill.
For target archery, the guides will get you into arrows that will suit your bow as a target bow. To use the charts you need to know your arrow length and draw weight on your fingers, when at your comfortable full draw posture.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
You will need to know that draw weight; there are two ways to find it. A bow scales that measures the poundage when you draw the bow to your full draw posture. And a method of calculating can be used if you know your draw length and the bow's marked weight.
 


Celtic Boar

New member
Ok thanks.
So.Stay away from cheap carbon arrows. Some websites are given a bung! [Cheeky sods!]

I looked at the easton target archery site, 3 options,

1. Bow selector = Recurve.
2. Draw weight = 40-44lbs. [Its a 40lb bow at 28", but I pull an extra 2 inches]
3. Arrow Selector = 31"

https://eastonarchery.com/group-t9/

I guess I'll just stick to that then? Still dont get it all though.

I mean theres a choice of 12 arrows, and they all have different figures under and next to them....?????!
Figures relate to figures? Which means for a layman guys, Im like, what the hell do i buy here then?
Whats best for me?

Take one, the model x7 eclipse:

SIZESPINEWEIGHT/GPI
X7 Eclipse23110.4508.9
23120.4239.5
22130.4609.9
22140.42510.4


Sorry for all the questions guys, but those figures to me are about as useful as a chocolate teapot.

Ive bought, easton powerflight 500 spine, 7.4gpi, feather fletchings, and carbon easton axis traditional arrows, 500 spine, 8.6gpi, 30.75"

So are they not right for my bow? So Ive bought the wrong thing then?

Because they arent on the list.

Im just gonna ring easton i think. probably best.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Arrows, as you know, have to be matched to the bows that they are shot from.
When they were mostly aluminium, the sizes were four figures, 2311 for example. 23 represents the diameter in 64ths " and 11 represents wall thickness 11 thousands ".
Once we got used to looking for arrows around a certain size 2311 for example, we could tell from the numbers whether the ones in the same group were fatter/thinner or lighter/heavier. 2311 would be fatter than 2211 and stiffer. 2214 would be thinner across but thicker walls made them heavier.
With carbons and ally/ carbons the numbers would be very different as the walls are thick and diameters are narrow. They use numbers that indicate how much they bend under a standard loading. so 600 bends easier than 400 as the numbers indicate.
Once there were different materials in common use they decided to group arrows according to how well they matched each other. So a group in T4 would shoot similarly to one another and the numbers tell you which sizes you need for each material. Generally the most expensive ones are first in the group and the cheaper ones are at the bottom of the group.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Arrows, as you know, have to be matched to the bows that they are shot from.
When they were mostly aluminium, the sizes were four figures, 2311 for example. 23 represents the diameter in 64ths " and 11 represents wall thickness 11 thousands ".
Once we got used to looking for arrows around a certain size 2311 for example, we could tell from the numbers whether the ones in the same group were fatter/thinner or lighter/heavier. 2311 would be fatter than 2211 and stiffer. 2214 would be thinner across but thicker walls made them heavier.
With carbons and ally/ carbons the numbers would be very different as the walls are thick and diameters are narrow. They use numbers that indicate how much they bend under a standard loading. so 600 bends easier than 400 as the numbers indicate.
Once there were different materials in common use they decided to group arrows according to how well they matched each other. So a group in T4 would shoot similarly to one another and the numbers tell you which sizes you need for each material. Generally the most expensive ones are first in the group and the cheaper ones are at the bottom of the group.
 


Timid Toad

Moderator
Staff member
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Ironman
At a guess you are going to have at least 44lbs on your fingers (conventional recurve roughly means 2lbs for every extra inch). If at all possible, borrow a reliable bowscale, and get someone to show you how to use it properly. That will give you a good working measurement.
As you have a long draw length you'll probably need an arrow a bit more than 1/2" longer than your draw. This might put you into the next arrow group up.
The next problem is check the stock length your chosen shaft comes in. No good if you need a 500 spine but it only comes in 30" maximum length.
When you do settle on something that will suit, remember that your shop will cut them to you required length. This is measured from the throat of the nock groove to the end of the shaft *not including the point*.
Of course, the best option is to call your local archery shop, then go down and let them take you through the process. You'll pick up a lot of (free) information along the way.
 


Celtic Boar

New member
At a guess you are going to have at least 44lbs on your fingers (conventional recurve roughly means 2lbs for every extra inch). If at all possible, borrow a reliable bowscale, and get someone to show you how to use it properly. That will give you a good working measurement.
As you have a long draw length you'll probably need an arrow a bit more than 1/2" longer than your draw. This might put you into the next arrow group up.
The next problem is check the stock length your chosen shaft comes in. No good if you need a 500 spine but it only comes in 30" maximum length.
When you do settle on something that will suit, remember that your shop will cut them to you required length. This is measured from the throat of the nock groove to the end of the shaft *not including the point*.
Of course, the best option is to call your local archery shop, then go down and let them take you through the process. You'll pick up a lot of (free) information along the way.
yeh i think ill do that cheers for the replies
 


ThomVis

Member
I would highly suggest you check Valrin. They've made a great resource about this topic.
I disagree with a lot in this article. I would suggest good coaching and a reputable archery shop (where the people behind the counter can help you and let you try different equipment) to start your archery career instead of this armchair article.
 


robert43

Member
I disagree with a lot in this article. I would suggest good coaching and a reputable archery shop (where the people behind the counter can help you and let you try different equipment) to start your archery career instead of this armchair article.
Very true otherwise you waste money & then get a bad taste in your mouth & probably give up archery
 


Timid Toad

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Adilator has been warned.
 


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