Coming Soon CNC machined metal ILF risers

JohnK

Well-known member
I've handled and drawn a bow with that riser. While it is heavy, as a target archer accustomed to all the additional weight of a stabiliser set up, it's not all that difficult.

As for a production CNC riser, I'm fairly sure this has had to go on the backburner indefinitely. Hopefully Sid will spot this thread and pop up to give us the official version.
 


KAS

New member
As for a production CNC riser, I'm fairly sure this has had to go on the backburner indefinitely. Hopefully Sid will spot this thread and pop up to give us the official version.
Out of interest how come its had to go on the back-burner?
 


JohnK

Well-known member
Probably because Border is a small company with a very large order book, and therefore has to pick and choose its lines of innovation and product development.
 


Steven Walter

New member
I hope they do not stick with those open limb pockets. They do not look right for me and make me think of entry level risers like Hoyt Excel or Horizon.

The Riser would look way better and be quite a bit stiffer with traditional limb pockets.
 


Timid Toad

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I hope they do not stick with those open limb pockets. They do not look right for me and make me think of entry level risers like Hoyt Excel or Horizon.

The Riser would look way better and be quite a bit stiffer with traditional limb pockets.
Closed limb pockets serve no function. They in fact make it less stiff - mass away from the hand makes the limb pockets flap around.
 


BorderBows

New member
I hope they do not stick with those open limb pockets. They do not look right for me and make me think of entry level risers like Hoyt Excel or Horizon.

The Riser would look way better and be quite a bit stiffer with traditional limb pockets.
limb pocket flex isnt an issue. the DAS 17" riser has a plate for the limb pocket and it doesnt have any issues.
riser flex on the other hand is always a concern, and id rather have the mass in the riser, where the flex happens, the limb butts seem like a illogical place to add the weight for cosmetic reasons.

the next added benefit to having minimal limb pockets is that the risers deflex puts the pockets belly side of the pivot point. so if you want the riser to balance properly, you need to remove the limb pocket mass so that the centre of gravity moves forward. into the grip.

the look of the riser has nothing to do with its market position.
the quality of the construction does.
CNC'd in full 3D with very tight tollerances is not something you find on entry level risers.

same as stainless steel hardware for the weight attachment points.
 


Steven Walter

New member
Closed limb pockets serve no function. They in fact make it less stiff - mass away from the hand makes the limb pockets flap around.
Did you follow the development of the first Vanquish Riser? The FEM simulation showed that there is a surprisingly large amount of energy handled by the sides of the limb pocket.
 


Timid Toad

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Did you follow the development of the first Vanquish Riser? The FEM simulation showed that there is a surprisingly large amount of energy handled by the sides of the limb pocket.
Yes, and I owned one. If stress is handled correctly elsewhere, it's not an issue. Don't forget the Vanquish started out as a student's project.
 


Timid Toad

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Risers made without twist in all planes have less stress to handle. Less mass moving around. It's about quality. Design and manufacture. Nice pic, btw.
 


BorderBows

New member
I don't get what you want to say.....

How do you want to handle stress occuring in the limb pocket elsewhere?




@Sid: did you do a FEM or do you plan to do one? That would be quite interesting.......
yes we have done alot of FEA and the stresses are spread nicely along the riser with very few "hot spots"
hot spots are relative terms mind.

if you have the following 11111111111911111111111111 the 9 is a hot spot.
if you have 88888888888888988888888888 again the 9 is a hotspot

the riser looks very even in its stress handling.

we are happy with it.

edit: i should have said, the FEA has been an integral part of the design process. not a final outcome, but more a means of highlighting areas that need more comprehensive modelling. afterall, every change impacts on the model.
 


JohnK

Well-known member
The PSE X-Factor had no sides on the limb pockets, and worked very well. I certainly never heard of any twisting or cracking problems with it.

And as Sid says, there are short trad-style metal risers with limb plates that work perfectly well at heavy draw weights.

- - - Updated - - -

The PSE X-Factor had no sides on the limb pockets, and worked very well. I certainly never heard of any twisting or cracking problems with it.

And as Sid says, there are short trad-style metal risers with limb plates that work perfectly well at heavy draw weights.
 


Flyingwatchmaker

New member
Huge bracing height there!
It's on the upper end of recommended, partly because I grabbed the first string I could find that looked the right length, partly because they are XS hex 5's on a 25" riser ;-)

T
 


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