Consistent anchor point

Kerf

Supporter
Supporter
Working your muscles to the limit tires you more without gaining power,
Interesting you should say this. I was talking to a physio friend today about finding a natural stop for the draw arm shoulder and he made exactly the same point - that it would quickly become tiring and would lead to a loss of control and therefore a loss of accuracy.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Working your muscles to the limit
I am not too clear what that means. Moving the joint to its limit, is what I thought was being suggested. In some postures, the muscles have to work harder because of the leverage they are put under.( draw elbow sticking out of line for example) A straight arm is considered better as the forces are bone on bone. The joint is almost at the limit of its movement but the muscles are not working to their limit.
 


ThomVis

Member
The joint is almost at the limit of its movement but the muscles are not working to their limit.
With the scapula being drawn towards the spine there is no real joint that limits it, just the contracting muscles (rhomboid major and lower trapezius) and the streching of the front tissue and clavicle.
To my knowledge, when a joint reaches it's limits, so will the muscle controlling it. It wouldn't be an effective muscle if it had "motion" to spare. Might be witin a couple of percentages.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Cheers for that. Just wanted to clear my confusion. "Muscles working to their limits" sounded as if they were weight lifting and close to bursting.
 


Hawkmoon

Member
I think what the OP is thinking of is that you should not let your anchor dictate your draw, you need to use a reasonable light bow and then come up to full draw and see where your hand is, then you can find at least 2 preferably three reference points to give you a fixed anchor. Too many archers just try and copy the anchor they have seen another archer use but as we are all slightly different shapes there is no one size fits all.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
It seems to me that things have been said in the past about anchor points,( centre of nose and chin springs to mind,) which are designed to make it easy to "tell others" what to do. A one size fits all approach.
I don't think that is a good plan; but what replaces it?
I like to use the ideas that the draw elbow should end up behind the draw hand( not sticking out of line) and at the same time brings the string into line with the aiming eye. Also, the index finger of the draw hand should have a good long contact with the underside of the jaw.
Usually that puts the string contact just off centre on the chin.
 


malbro

Instinctive Archer
Supporter
I have noticed that there is a difference between field and target archery, in field the archer is taught to draw to an achor point on the cheek rather than under the chin which was how I was taught on a beginners course at a Target club, luckily my coach appreciated my previous experience with a field coach and only suggested I tried the under the chin position, rather than pushed me to use it. In the end I returned to the cheek position as it felt more natural to me and I get better groupings that way (indoors), however I do appreciate that the higher anchor point is better suited to shorter distances. Incidently I shoot barebow of the shelf with no sights, stabilisers or other any other assistance.
 


Kerf

Supporter
Supporter
I think what the OP is thinking of is that you should not let your anchor dictate your draw, you need to use a reasonable light bow and then come up to full draw and see where your hand is, then you can find at least 2 preferably three reference points to give you a fixed anchor. Too many archers just try and copy the anchor they have seen another archer use but as we are all slightly different shapes there is no one size fits all.
Actually that is precisely what I was driving at. Thanks for understanding me better than I understand myself!
 


KidCurry

Well-known member
Shooting target archery barebow I have two anchor points. For 90m & 70m I use a standard under chin, tip of nose anchor which gets me point on gold with 3mm string walking at 90m. At 50m/60yds I use a higher side of face anchor with the big thumb joint located in the indent between the back of the jaw bone and the neck muscle. The smaller thumb joint will just touch the lower corner of the jaw bone.
 


Kerf

Supporter
Supporter
Shooting target archery barebow I have two anchor points. For 90m & 70m I use a standard under chin, tip of nose anchor which gets me point on gold with 3mm string walking at 90m. At 50m/60yds I use a higher side of face anchor with the big thumb joint located in the indent between the back of the jaw bone and the neck muscle. The smaller thumb joint will just touch the lower corner of the jaw bone.
Do you use split finger at the longer distances and three under when you anchor on your face?
 


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