Draw length?

Hudzi93

New member


I have a question about draw length. From what I understand the AMO draw length measurement is to the centre of the button + 1 3/4 inches and this measures exactly to the back of the bow. My arrows measure 29 1/8 inches to the end of the shaft and I've found that I'm drawing such that the shaft end is in line with the back of the clicker plate screw. Measuring from there to the back of the bow gives me 5/8 of an inch. Does that make my draw length 29 3/4 inches? The reason I'm wanting to know is because limb draw weight is measured at 28" so I would like to know how much extra weight I'd be pulling. If my measurement is correct then I'd be pulling around 3# above the marked weight, right?
 

lbp121

Member
The weight increase is roughly right, better to actually weigh it though. The draw length calculation may be wrong as the AMO length is to the throat of the grip, not the button + 1 3/4. With many bows this is the same place but on some the button hole is not in line with the grip.
 

Hudzi93

New member
The weight increase is roughly right, better to actually weigh it though. The draw length calculation may be wrong as the AMO length is to the throat of the grip, not the button + 1 3/4. With many bows this is the same place but on some the button hole is not in line with the grip.
Say I changed the grip to one with a shallower throat. I would be able to draw further, therefore increasing the poundage of the limbs, although my draw length remains the same if I measure to the throat of the grip. Measuring to the button would show an increased draw length and would then accommodate for the increase in draw weight. This is what confuses me about measuring to the throat of the grip.
 

Hudzi93

New member
The only thing that can explain my dilemma is that the throat of the grip is something that is meant to remain consistent when changing between different grips, although they may be higher/lower at the bottom part of the grip where they contact the palm. Is this the case? If so then that would solve my problem.
 

fbirder

Supporter
Supporter
The weight increase is roughly right, better to actually weigh it though. The draw length calculation may be wrong as the AMO length is to the throat of the grip, not the button + 1 3/4. With many bows this is the same place but on some the button hole is not in line with the grip.
Wrong. The AMO drawlength is string to throat of the grip + 1 3/4. In some cases throat of grip = button.
I think this may be a problem with punctuation, rather than a factual error. I read it as "the AMO length is to the throat of the grip, not the button, + 1 3/4."
 

lbp121

Member
Thank you to those who assumed I did know what I meant, rather than what I wrote! Correct, there was an omitted coma. Now, you can get excited about my spelling!
 

joetapley

New member
Say I changed the grip to one with a shallower throat. I would be able to draw further, therefore increasing the poundage of the limbs, although my draw length remains the same if I measure to the throat of the grip. Measuring to the button would show an increased draw length and would then accommodate for the increase in draw weight. This is what confuses me about measuring to the throat of the grip.
Archery so called Standards are never precise so don't bother to much with fine detail. There is really no point in even measuring draw weight precisely so don't worry about it. Using draw weight for arrow selection (tables) is largely guesswork so no point in measuring draw weight accurately.
The only time I have ever "measured" my draw weight was just to illustrate to someone how much the measured value can vary depending on how you measure it. The only accurate draw weight you need is the one where you adjust the draw weight as part of a bow set up process - and here the actual draw weight value is of course irrelevant.
 

Hudzi93

New member
Well in that case, my draw length is approx 29.5" (although it can vary by +/- a small amount, depending on how tired my muscles are). I'm quite surprised by this though as at some point I though my DL was about 28.5". It's nice to know that I'm pulling a little heavier than I thought.
 

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
The only thing that can explain my dilemma is that the throat of the grip is something that is meant to remain consistent when changing between different grips, although they may be higher/lower at the bottom part of the grip where they contact the palm. Is this the case? If so then that would solve my problem.
Um well. It's kind of backwards...
The pivot point is where your hand pushes against the grip. I think the reasoning is that your arm length isn't going to change (barring an accident with a chain saw). So the draw length is related to your physical dimensions, not the bow's...
 

joetapley

New member
Um well. It's kind of backwards...
The pivot point is where your hand pushes against the grip. I think the reasoning is that your arm length isn't going to change (barring an accident with a chain saw). So the draw length is related to your physical dimensions, not the bow's...
And following on from the above the assumption is that all bows are much the same i.e.
- actual pivot point has fixed position relative to the throat
- depth of grip always the same
- rest contact point and button positioned more or less vertically above throat
- width of bow window always pretty much the same (so "back of bow" references have some meaning)
 

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
And following on from the above the assumption is that all bows are much the same i.e.
- actual pivot point has fixed position relative to the throat
- depth of grip always the same
- rest contact point and button positioned more or less vertically above throat
- width of bow window always pretty much the same (so "back of bow" references have some meaning)
When you're talking about draw length and weight, comparisons assume that the equipment compared has a similar geometry, or the basis for comparison disappears...

But fundamentally, that's the problem, especially when mixing and matching kit between different mfrs.
 
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