Gillo GT Riser 2019

Whitehart

Well-known member
So Vittorio has done it again, drawing upon his vast experience to finally move ILF geometry on.

A massive 30% draw weight adjustment (For example 40lb limbs can go down approximately to 34lb and fully wound in 46lb). All done with a clever limb pocket adjustment that keeps the limbs seated properly making the bow easy to tune.

Initially struggled to understand how you could have such an adjustment range, now after having a play - it works at all limb pocket angles.

Hats off to Lancaster archery they have done a very informative video on Facebook
 


geoffretired

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Great bit of free thinking. It looks really well made, and I mean that in a serious way, not just eye catching.
 


LionOfNarnia

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LOL I wondered how long it would take for someone to repost that!
(I watched it on Thursday night)
I do find that 'pivoting pocket' thing a fascinating concept, once it's inevitably copied by everyone else (Assuming it does what it says on the tin) 'coz it could halve the number of limbs needed...

...and yes I mean pairs, a single-limb'd bow hasn't even been tried by Peter Jackson (yet?)!

I haven't seen any prices yet but I'm guessing that it will be at least 3 times what I see as a practical, affordable amount to spend on any middle-bit.
 


KidCurry

Well-known member
Wow... at last some real innovation for a recurve/barebow. I was beginning to wonder if there was anywhere left to go :) I guess it will piss off the limb manufactures no end. One decent set of limbs may well be all any average archer will need if it gets them from 30lb to 40lb and being able to buy them earlier without worrying about losing money on expensive limbs.
I guess if the patent is sound Hoyt and Win&Win will be kicking themselves :)
 


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geoffretired

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One decent set of limbs may well be all any average archer will need if it gets them from 30lb to 40lb
Heehee, that might be true; unless the archers stay true to their need to upgrade to "better" limbs.
Someone will be already working on why heavy limbs shot on a very light setting is not a good idea. Loss of efficiency perhaps?
 


chuffalump

Member
Is there going to be an issue with limb efficiency though? If limbs work best over specific brace heights due to where the string leaves the limb groove, then the outer limits of Gillo adjustment will stretch this relationship far beyond current ranges. If that's correct then maybe you'd need different strings at either end of the adjustment, to avoid over or under twisting.

Either way it will be interesting to see.
 


geoffretired

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I'm not sure that the range of weight will have much effect on the string groove separation points.
But, the need to change limbs will persist, I feel, because we like changing things; do we not?
 


bimble

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Ironman
considering how long adjustable limb pockets have been on compounds I'm surprised it's taken this long to appear on a recurve.
 


Stretch

Active member
Firstly, the limb pivoting system is not new even on recurves. There was a Bernardini that did this way back in the mid 90s. But the way they have thought it through on the Gillo is clever.

Without having one in my hands it is hard to see how the the pocket moves but it would seem like the bow geometry will change a little. So when wound in it will be more like Hoyt HP geometry and when wound out opposite. But the point of the limb pivot looks like it doesn’t move that much. So my guess is that this won’t be noticeable to mortal archers and is way offset by the benefits.

Nice. I’d consider it if I was looking for some new metal.

Stretch
 


JohnK

Well-known member
I think people may find that adjusting the pockets to the extremes of the range will have an interesting effect on the behaviour of the limbs. Anyone who has seen the effect of winding limb bolts all the way in, or playing with the extremes of bracing height ranges, may know what I mean.

That said, I wonder whether the pivoting limb pocket (which I think the old Merlin Classic offered as a feature as well?) might help reduce the effects of the extremes of the geometry.

I look forwards to seeing what the early adopters discover about setting up these risers.
 


JohnK

Well-known member
Also, I should say that I really like the UFO v-bar. If I had a Gillo, I'd definitely pick one of those up to play with.
 


Timid Toad

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My concern here is the potential, in the hands of someone who either doesn't understand what's going on or is trying to achieve something outwith the average remit of their kit, to effectively overdraw their limbs a long way past their designed drawlengths. This could potentially break them or over time cause failure.
How does Gillo mitigate against this?
 


Stretch

Active member
As no manufacturer that I am aware of states a maximum drawlength for their limbs there must be a base assumption that you can shoot them with as much poundage as you can get out of them. The Gillo design just allows you access to it.

Hoyt were quite happy for me to shoot medium limbs at 32” draw. (On 27”)

Of course your limb is lighter for proportional draw weight so I could imagine some super light limbs being a bit rough if maxed out. All supposition.

The only detractor that I see is the mass. They are heavy relative to the competition. If you shoot say a 25” GMX then you won’t notice. But the 27” Formula is 160g heavier than my Prodigy RX. Probably due to the multipurpose barebow compatible design. But I think it’s a bit beefy for me o_O

If I wanted to shoot a 1.5kg riser I’d still be shooting my Axis :oops: too old and achy for that.

Stretch
 


Timid Toad

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But you'll still get people with a 25" shooting mediums (and the possibility even shorts) setting the bow up to mimic a 32" draw. That would invalidate your warranty for at least one manufacturer I can think of. I'm sure it'll feel horrible, but since when has that stopped any one, and when ever has common sense prevailed?
 


Stretch

Active member
1: I’m all for natural selection :devilish:

2: I don’t know what manufacturer that would be... as many manufacturers are testing to thousands of dry fires which is massively more damaging than over drawing by 4”

3: Plenty of trad nuts putting these limbs in 21” and shorter risers. Doesn’t appear to kill them?

So in summary, anyone dumb enough to put £70 short limbs in a £700 29” riser and then shoot 34” ACE of it with 60# otf, kind of deserves what’s coming to them.

I hear you, I just doubt it is an issue.

Stretch
 


JohnK

Well-known member
3: Plenty of trad nuts putting these limbs in 21” and shorter risers. Doesn’t appear to kill them?
From what I remember of my time on trad forums, "warfed" bows (small compound risers with ILF limbs modded and fitted) can be problematic because of geometry issues, rather than specifically because of the draw length.
 


Hawkmoon

Member
Basically when they are at the maximum you are going to be putting a lot of pre-load on the limbs and unwinding the recurve before the draw, this is what could have a big effect on the shot as you could be taking the limbs way beyond their designed range, on the other extreme you could be barely getting into the limbs efficient working range. If this is the case then spending six hundred pounds on two extra pairs of limbs would be a better bet, but we will have to see how it performs in the real world, I suspect most buyers will play about a bit and then keep the limbs somewhere around the middle of their range.
 


Hawkmoon

Member
As no manufacturer that I am aware of states a maximum drawlength for their limbs there must be a base assumption that you can shoot them with as much poundage as you can get out of them. The Gillo design just allows you access to it.

Hoyt were quite happy for me to shoot medium limbs at 32” draw. (On 27”)

Of course your limb is lighter for proportional draw weight so I could imagine some super light limbs being a bit rough if maxed out. All supposition.

The only detractor that I see is the mass. They are heavy relative to the competition. If you shoot say a 25” GMX then you won’t notice. But the 27” Formula is 160g heavier than my Prodigy RX. Probably due to the multipurpose barebow compatible design. But I think it’s a bit beefy for me o_O

If I wanted to shoot a 1.5kg riser I’d still be shooting my Axis :oops: too old and achy for that.

Stretch
What about the high preload that is going to unwind part of the rercurve before you even draw and then keep it wound out at the end of the shot, the very thing that adds "smoothness" to modern limbs. Do you think this will have much effect on the draw/shot.
 


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