[Horsebow] GNAS (GB) proposed horse bow class

Thorvald

Active member
Most fibreglass AR bows are fitted with wooden Siyahs, so I'd maybe class that as a composite? All wood bows would be ok too I think. The only wooden bows that I can think of that aren't laminated (which I thought of as composite construction) would be an AFB, which normally has an arrowshelf, or ELB, which isn't recurved... I might be showing a lack of knowledge here... :)
AFB's are laminated wood and fibreglass longbows. I think EFB is all-wooden and not laminated - but I am not sure if an EFB can be laminated from two different woods for example.
 


FlightyRachel

New member
Fonz Awardee
Thank you all so much for this fascinating thread! My 13 year old son is back shooting his Mongolian bow, and the only frustration is that he hasn't got a class to shoot in! Currently he shoots as barebow but compares his scores with longbows, is that what you all do? (I will get him to upload his scores as and when, to add to the database, unless you don't really want junior scores?). Tbh, I really hoped that during my absence from archery, horse bows might have been recognised. They are such fabulous bows and so fun to shoot; I don't think I've ever got mine out without someone coming over to have a look and a play. (I've got a Grozer Hunnish bow). Do any of you shoot NFAS? Are you classed as HT still?
 


Dorset Lass

New member
Ironman
Hiya Rachel - yes HT with wooden arrows or primitive if you have a horn and sinew bow with no fibreglass.

The AIUK Frostbite Challenge just after Christmas had an actual horsebow class. Great fun and so nice to shoot against other horsebows - hopefully we will have more of the same this year :)
 


FlightyRachel

New member
Fonz Awardee
Thanks DL! I don't think I'd be allowed in primitive, not sure of the exact make up of bow, and I have plastic nocks. Tut tut! :)

The Frostbite sounds fun, I'll look out for it. It would be nice to shoot against some more horse bows. I only shoot it for laughs, but it's still annoying to have your score compared to someone with an arrow rest!
 


Dorset Lass

New member
Ironman
Thumb Loose Ruling Update/Clarification

Hi All
A small update on the asiatic recurve/horsebow issue. A member of our club has asked for clarification from the GNAS on the use of a thumb loose or a thumb ring in target or field competitions. He was quoting the ROS re Traditional which state that "archers must adhere to one anchor point and one finger position on the string throughout the tournament". This doesn't mention the thumb so he asked how that relates to a thumb loose. The reply was that a 'plain thumb ring can be used but it must not have any notch or hook that could be construed as a release aid.'

What I would like to know is whether anyone has shot using a thumb loose at a GNAS target competition and if so was it accepted by the judge on the day? I realise that these sort of things can take a while to filter down to the ground level.

I have been using a Mediterranean release for target and field and a thumb loose for horseback (or when I injured the middle finger on my right hand in martial arts - it was last October and the joint is still enlarged!). I am seriously considering converting full time to a thumb loose at the end of the season. I mostly shoot NFAS field (primitive) where a thumb loose would be acceptable, but I do want to enter GNAS target and clout competitions every so often. If I go to a GNAS event I would like to know that I won't have any problems on the day if I use a thumb loose. I have been using a leather thumb tab with no ridge or hook incorporated.

So if anyone is still following this thread please let me know what your experiences have been with GNAS and the thumb loose in practice? Thanks very much in advance for any help or reassurance!
 


Wode

New member
Well if you are going to call it Horse Bow and not Asiatic Recurve, remember the Indians of North America made many types of Horse Bows that look nothing like and are shot differently than Asiatic Recurves.
 


Stuart Hoppe

New member
I had a good one the other night i asked if i could use a kisser button on a horse bow no was the reply,because its an self bow so i said a longbow is as well but you can use a kisser botton? Who made these out of date rules?
 


Thorvald

Active member
You are not allowed to use a kisser on a longbow either. The only bowtype where this is allowed is recurve bow class.
 


mk1

It's an X
Supporter
Hi All
A small update on the asiatic recurve/horsebow issue. A member of our club has asked for clarification from the GNAS on the use of a thumb loose or a thumb ring in target or field competitions. He was quoting the ROS re Traditional which state that "archers must adhere to one anchor point and one finger position on the string throughout the tournament". This doesn't mention the thumb so he asked how that relates to a thumb loose. The reply was that a 'plain thumb ring can be used but it must not have any notch or hook that could be construed as a release aid.'

What I would like to know is whether anyone has shot using a thumb loose at a GNAS target competition and if so was it accepted by the judge on the day? I realise that these sort of things can take a while to filter down to the ground level.

... but I do want to enter GNAS target and clout competitions every so often. If I go to a GNAS event I would like to know that I won't have any problems on the day if I use a thumb loose. I have been using a leather thumb tab with no ridge or hook incorporated.
I'd suggest getting a printout/copy of the reply that you're Club mate got and stick it in your bow bag making sure it has the name of the authority, then you can politely refer any dissenting judge to it should the need arise :)
 


ChakaZulu

New member
I'm pretty sure that the RoS say that thumbrings are allowed, but not with a groove (which is kinda odd given how you should use a thumbring, but there it is...). Take a copy of that and point out that it would be a very odd rule to have if thumb release weren't allowed.

Either that or just ride away when the judge comes over...
 


Hi,

Read most of this post with interest. Sounds very interesting but raises a couple of questions (tongue in cheek):

1. Surely the title of the discipline/classification should be "Horse Bow - (unmounted).
2. Following on from this there should also be a discipline/classification for the true use of the bow ie "Horse Bow - (mounted)". Adoption of this classification by GNAS would also therefore require the GNAS to develop a specification for a Standard Horse to be used. Colour might be a problem - white is ok but I have yet to see a green one. Target field layout might be a problem as well. Would archers (and Dobbins) canter past the targets in succession or would it be a more realistic massed charge "Mongol Horde" style? This could really take off as a spectator sport!

Dennis.
 


Dr.Bob

New member
Hi,

Read most of this post with interest. Sounds very interesting but raises a couple of questions (tongue in cheek):

1. Surely the title of the discipline/classification should be "Horse Bow - (unmounted).
2. Following on from this there should also be a discipline/classification for the true use of the bow ie "Horse Bow - (mounted)". Adoption of this classification by GNAS would also therefore require the GNAS to develop a specification for a Standard Horse to be used. Colour might be a problem - white is ok but I have yet to see a green one. Target field layout might be a problem as well. Would archers (and Dobbins) canter past the targets in succession or would it be a more realistic massed charge "Mongol Horde" style? This could really take off as a spectator sport!

Dennis.
Re the GNAS 'standard horse', if you type 'horse designed by a committee' into Google, you will find that such an animal already exists. It is called a camel :)
 


Dorset Lass

New member
Ironman
Hi,

2. Following on from this there should also be a discipline/classification for the true use of the bow ie "Horse Bow - (mounted)". Adoption of this classification by GNAS would also therefore require the GNAS to develop a specification for a Standard Horse to be used. Colour might be a problem - white is ok but I have yet to see a green one. Target field layout might be a problem as well. Would archers (and Dobbins) canter past the targets in succession or would it be a more realistic massed charge "Mongol Horde" style? This could really take off as a spectator sport!
Dennis.
Dennis I know you are just having fun with us but there is already the British Horseback Archery Association - maybe you should check out their website. There are specific competition styles, target distances and scoring methods. No standard horse and no massed charges but a great spectator sport all the same.
 


snowman

Member
Don't be surprised if somebody has access to an indoor riding arena, a horse and enjoys archery.

I believe there is at least one archery club who have access to a riding arena in winter.

Oh shoot too late to buy a lottery ticket tonight.
 


Paul C

New member
Notch on thumb ring

Hello, new here, American, and first post.
I am wondering why having a small notch in the thumb ring seems to be considered an unfair advantage, as the ring I bought with the bow I picked up in Mongolia this summer and also a ring I am thinking of buying from Korea both have. The explanation I got from the Mongolian bowyer, which is also what is on the site for the Korean ring, is that the notch is primarily to keep the string on the ring rather than behind the ring on your skin, where it tends to turn the end of your thumb blue from blood blisters. This made perfect sense to me. Does having this very tiny ridge actually give a big mechanical advantage to release?

Please keep in mind that I am still working in Mongolia, the bow is already home, I have not shot it yet, and my experience is with long and compound bows, in each case using a three finger release.

The notched rings are used almost exclusively in Mongolia for competition at the Naadam Festivals here.
 


Dorset Lass

New member
Ironman
Hi Paul C
A warm welcome to AIUK. So you are working in Mongolia...I have a real yearning to go to a Naadam Festival - maybe one day I will manage it. Have you been able to get some tuition in traditional Mongolian shooting styles?

Re the groove in the thumb ring it does seem to act as a bit of a mechanical release, because there is a point at which you can't hold the string anymore and it just seems to release 'on its own'. Very disconcerting if you ask me and the reason why I prefer a leather thumb tab!
 


Si2

New member
One thing that must be covered in this class ruling, if it ever materialises, it to allow traditional methods that are appropriate to this family of bow.

one is thumbring release - both notched metal and leaher - in fact any material.
Two is the use of natural materials, including bamboo, in arrows.

Si2
 


Dorset Lass

New member
Ironman
One thing that must be covered in this class ruling, if it ever materialises, it to allow traditional methods that are appropriate to this family of bow.

one is thumbring release - both notched metal and leaher - in fact any material.
Two is the use of natural materials, including bamboo, in arrows.

Si2
Totally agree with this...Any news on taking this forward? Is it still a question of gathering round scores and waiting until there is enough data before making an approach to the GNAS or NFAS?

I am trying to do my bit by shooting a horsebow at the odd target competition (as barebow of course) and getting the bow style more visible. I have had many comments about how it is not fair for these bows to be up against barebow. Doesn't seem as though it would be fair to put them in with longbow either as they would out perform them. I am hoping that in time momentum will build up, more people will shoot them 'in public' and that there will be a real impetus to create a new class.
 


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