How do magnetic arrow rests work?

Newalpost

New member
Just been looking at alternate arrow rests and I'm interested to know how those advertised as 'Magnetic' work. I saw one that was advertised as Stainless Steel and Magnetic - an interesting combination!

Thxs
 


EVC

New member
A small magnet pulls the arm back to the rest position.

There are the simpler versions (the magnet is the circle bit to the right):
sf-elite-rest_1.jpg

And more sofisticated, that provide easier ways to adjust the arm position, as the Shybuya Ultima and Spigarelly Z/T.
 


Newalpost

New member
Does this mean that the magnet pulls the arm out to support the arrow and then when the arrow is released the arm is pushed back to the plate by the progress of the fletchings through rest? In other words to minimize deflection of the arrow.
 


EVC

New member
It may do as the pulling force is not high (the Z/T even allows you to adjust the pulling force). However if your bow and arrows are poperly tuned, the flechings pass at a distance from the rest.

[video]https://youtu.be/CO102jz8sFM[/video]

If either tuning is not that good or a bad release occurs, the magnet force will not make a difference.
 


Rik

Supporter
Supporter
It's why a Hoyt super pro rest (or Beiter) works as well as a flipper rest, if you have the correct arrows...
 


Darth Tom

Member
It's basically magic, no one really knows how they work, but as long as you believe it does, you should be fine. Just don't lose faith in the middle of a championship final...
 


blakey

Active member
It may do as the pulling force is not high (the Z/T even allows you to adjust the pulling force). However if your bow and arrows are poperly tuned, the flechings pass at a distance from the rest.

[video]https://youtu.be/CO102jz8sFM[/video]

If either tuning is not that good or a bad release occurs, the magnet force will not make a difference.
So really it's irrelevant if you have a good tune? I hadn't thought of this before. It sounds like another con to part us from our money! :)
 


bimble

Well-known member
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
Ironman
So really it's irrelevant if you have a good tune? I hadn't thought of this before. It sounds like another con to part us from our money! :)
Can you spend ?10, ?15, ?20 pounds on a rest... sure. Have Olympic gold medals been won with a ?1 Hoyt Super Rest... also yes!! ;)

 


chuffalump

Well-known member
A reasonable one is also more adjustable than a plastic jobbie. If you care about getting your arrows to sit bang on central to the button you don't have to unstick and reset if you make a mistake or change types. Never having used a plastic one, I can't comment on their lifespan but a magnetic flip rest is the metal answer to the flexibility of a plastic one.
 


Mufti

Member
Image3.jpg
Or you can be brave, glue a steel shaft into your riser and believe the slo mo videos.
Yes it's limiting on arrow diameter, but I only have one set.

I suggest prayer might work better than magic!
 


Newalpost

New member
I was aware of the Archers Paradox but didn't think the wobble started that early. Seems to imply then that if you rely on this to have the fletchings clear the rest then you need to tune the bow/button/arrow very carefully.

For what its worth I use the low cost Super Hoyt and have no real complaints but I'm a believer in the Doctrine of Small Changes. So, in trying to improve my consistency I'm looking at all the variables and wondering what I can do to make things better even if it's in little steps.

I think for now I'll but the Arrow Rest question to rest :poulies:

Thxs
 


Rik

Supporter
Supporter
I was aware of the Archers Paradox but didn't think the wobble started that early. Seems to imply then that if you rely on this to have the fletchings clear the rest then you need to tune the bow/button/arrow very carefully.

For what its worth I use the low cost Super Hoyt and have no real complaints but I'm a believer in the Doctrine of Small Changes. So, in trying to improve my consistency I'm looking at all the variables and wondering what I can do to make things better even if it's in little steps.

I think for now I'll but the Arrow Rest question to rest :poulies:

Thxs
It's not paradox, because we're talking about bows cut over centre....
No, it's normal shaft matching. That's what it's about: choosing the shafts which can be set up to behave the right way. You know, Easton charts and all that?
 


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