Indoor Club Shooting for Beginner

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Sorry in advance for a long meandering post:-
I've been asked by my niece to make bows for her partner and her 10 yr old son (Both new to archery). I'm a tad iffy about the whole thing and anxious not to produce something inappropriate. They will be visiting to try some bows and have a go next weekend.
The adult is no prob as I can make a Hickory backed Lemonwood ELB of a suitable draw weight, but I'm reluctant to produce a nicely crafted wooden bow for the 10 yr old which won't perform well enough or will be seen as "un cool" or be sneered at by people who won't know anything about wooden bows.
One of the bugbears will be arrows (I don't much like making arrows).
I know the normal advice would be be join a club and use their bows first, then come back for bows if they take to it. This is probably what I'll advise. But I would rather they didn't start with modern materials and bows with cutaways etc.
I have a few specific questions and I'm also interested in general sensible constructive advice as target shooting isn't my thing.
1. Can I assume indoor target will be at 10 and 20 yards (metres)?
2. How many arrows in an indoor end? I'm assuming 6 but wonder if 3 may be used to avoid smashing arrows (and I'd rather make 3 ;) )
3. Are wooden bows (other than ELB) and arrows seen/accepted at clubs and welcomed or are they seen as weird. (I'd rather the lad shot a wooden bow than a plastic 'snake bow' one).
I'm thinking a neolithic style bow of Hazel or maybe a Bhutanese style bamboo bow rather than a longbow, because it's difficult to build a nicely performing low draw weight ELB (I'd rather make a 40# than a 20# ! )

This may all sound a tad paranoid, but it's a tricky position I'm in. I don't want to lavish a load of time and care on something that won't be appreciated, especially as this will effectively be done at cost of materials. I'm also wondering, is this what the lad wants or is it just something the adults want him to want!
Del
PS. My niece's dad (my Brother) died about 8 years ago, so I'm keen to be supportive in this quest.
 
Hi Del - heres my tuppence worth...

1. Vast majority of indoor shooting is at 18m/20yds. Some longer rounds exist, but very few clubs have the facilities for them. A Portsmouth (5dz at 20yds) is the norm in the UK

2. Indoor rounds tend to be shot in ends of 3, some clubs do ends of 4 on club days to incease the chance of finishing the round in the booked time. 4 arrows should be sufficient for most eventualities

3. Depends on individual clubs. Some restrict bow types to those officially recognised in competition, others are more open - a call or email to the local club in question might be the best here

Hope that helps

Dan
 

mbaker74

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Heres another 2p....

We shoot mainly 20yds, but also 18 and 25m. the furthest you would shoot for an "indoor" round is 30m and as Dan said, not many clubs have the space for this.

We shoot ends of 3 and 6 depending on who is there that night or practising competition shooting.

We have ELB, horse bows etc shooting alongside recurve and compound.

One thing to consider, we have one lady who recently switched from recurve to ELB, she has already broken 3 or 4 wooden arrows hitting the stands etc, so would be worth supplying a couple of spares...
 

Timid Toad

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Just to check - the club your family will be joining is AGB affiliated? Self bows aren't usually recognised, although I don't think anyone would stop them shooting one. For lots of very silly reasons an ELB is supposed to have horn nocks. Sorry if you already knew that, not trying to teach my grandmother to suck eggs, just going through all the obvious before you start something that costs money.
And children need to have very light poundages - someone realised giving a 10 year old 40lbs causes deformities! so 15lbs or so is more in the ball park.

As you sensibly suggest I'd want them, particularly the youngster to start out on a jellybow. Lighter than a wood riser bow, no cut out and tiddly poundages.

Hope they realise what lucky folk they are. Something marvelous about having something crafted with love just for you.
 

Rik

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Indoor round wise: rarely, people shoot a Worcester round which has 5 arrow ends.

I saw an article about a pyramidal/triangular limb shape, which was supposed to produce more "bang per buck" than most flatbow designs, but it was a long, long time ago...
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Thanks for all the input.
@ Rik
Hi, yeah, I was thinking of something that is somewhat pyramid/lenticular in limb shape that would conform to an AFB definition and would suit the properties of Hazel.
I've got an assortment of bows that are between about #15 and 20# @ 22" which should be good for him to try out. (They all go out to 28" and that's what I'd make so it won't get grown out of )
Del
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Thanks for all the input.
@ Rik
Hi, yeah, I was thinking of something that is somewhat pyramid/lenticular in limb shape that would conform to an AFB definition and would suit the properties of Hazel.
I've got an assortment of bows that are between about #15 and 20# @ 22" which should be good for him to try out.
Del
 

geoffretired

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Del, are the people concerned really aware of what they are asking for?I could imagine them wanting to take up archery, and thinking of you and your bow making and perhaps not realising that for the majority archery is very different. For example, selecting a beginner bow from a whole range of bows at a club is just about the opposite of having a tailor made bow..... for someone who may have little or no idea what they really need. I would try to influence them along the road of a beginners course first and have a Bespoke bow made when they are aware of all the options. I can imagine you putting in hours of work and finding the bows never get used three months down the line. It is a big ask that they are making. Bigger than they imagine, I would guess.As you are the expert, my guess is they would listen to your reasoning, and go with what you say.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
@geoff
I've never met the adult so I have no idea!
A beginners course and borrowed equipment is sort of what I'm anticipating, but I don't want to be a wet blanket.
Hopefully at the weekend I'll work out what's going on, anyhow.
It maybe that they'll be shooting at some woodcraft group/scouts or some such or on private land, I dunno... I'll have to find out.
It's all a bit sketchy.
I'll be my usual open and honest as that generally works out best in the long run, and if I do make something it will be relatively plain and simple.
I'll let 'em know you can't just wander around with bow these days etc. But trying to give the safety talk and a run down of all the various disciplines and basic shooting technique is a tall order in a few hours.
I'll also have to explain/demo the difference between a target shooting technique and a primitive/field technique... it's ok to cant the bow, but you may get taught to hold it upright. Mediterranean loose, but someone may try and get you shooting 3 under etc..... (groan)
Wish I hadn't been asked really :( , but I'll make a good go of it and report back.
Del
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Duplicate turned into a PS.
I have a good stock of less exotic materials that I can use and I can make a couple of bread and butter bows in a week or so. It's the arrows that will bug me!
Del
The butter side will be on the back of the bow ;)
 

fbirder

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3. Depends on individual clubs. Some restrict bow types to those officially recognised in competition,
The AGB definition of a Recurve bow is so open that anything can fit in its definition. I shoot AFB at our club, but it's treated as recurve barebow for classification because it fits and AGB have classification scores for barebow.

202. Recurve (Freestyle) The following items are permitted:

(a) Bow
(i) A bow of any type provided it subscribes to the accepted principle and meaning of the word
bow as used in archery, e.g., an instrument consisting of a handle(grip), riser (no shoot
through type) and two flexible limbs each ending in a tip with a string nock.
(ii) The bow is braced for use by a single string attached directly between the two string nocks
only, and in operation is held in one hand by its handle (grip) while the fingers of the other
hand draw, hold back and release the string.
(iii) Multi coloured bow risers and trademarks located on the inside of the upper limb are
permitted.
 

Corax67

Well-known member
Hi Del - at the indoor club I guest shoot at there are a number of archers using ELB, self bows and flatbows weekly to undertake Portsmouth rounds (20yds & 3 arrows per end) and have a lot of fun in the process.

They do tend to have quite a high arrow attrition rate though as any miss is into a breeze block wall or target stand.

The clubs attitude is 'it doesn't matter what you shoot as long as you do it safely' which makes for a great atmosphere.

Canting the bow in a restricted indoor space may annoy some archers on the line so I assume they would be asked to shoot with a vertical bow.



Karl
 

Rik

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Supporter
Duplicate turned into a PS.
I have a good stock of less exotic materials that I can use and I can make a couple of bread and butter bows in a week or so. It's the arrows that will bug me!
Del
The butter side will be on the back of the bow ;)
Well that will make it less likely to slip in the hand, at least... but bread on the belly might be a bit spongy?
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Dodged the bullet

It turned out that the adult couldn't come due to having just had abdominal surgery. The lad was ok, but really lacked the control and was a tad short on strength. Give him a year and he'll prob' be ok for having a go. He enjoyed shooting some of my bows, and was getting to grips with an anchor and not grasping the string with a fist, but I could see he didn't really have the control yet. As he tired he started letting the draw hand travel forward as if trying to push the arrow.
He had a go with some wood working tools spokeshave draw knife and rasps and certainly enjoyed himself :)
Del
 

Timid Toad

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You'll have a young apprentice - he'll have made his own bow and be ready to shoot it!
 

Rik

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It's no good. I can't see the words "young apprentice" without hearing them in the Emperor's voice...
 

Rik

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I can't fit that with Del, somehow... He just doesn't come across as a wizened old guy in a hood...
 
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