instructions prior to first clout shoot.

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I am trying to find some help with giving instructions to archers prior to taking part in their first clout shoot.
I could not find anything on AGB website. Perhaps I was looking in the wrong places.
Thank you.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi AndyW
Thanks for the thought. I read that but all it says is that first time clout shooters must receive instructions, but not what those instructions should be.
I've attended enough clouts to know what archers have to do. But I wondered if AGB had some special instructions that they require to be delivered.
 


mk1

It's an X
Supporter
Im pretty sure that the judges will provide this intruction on the day. You could try searching on this forum as I'm sure this question has been asked before and it's possible some resources links were provided - Ha


and I supplied a link - http://www.ncas.co.uk/judges/E_Clout Archery.pdf
 


Timid Toad

Moderator
Staff member
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Fonz Awardee
Ironman
Judges do not provide instruction. It is the responsibility of archers to know what they are doing and to be safe.
I always tell potential clouters to look for an organised session for those looking to find out or to approach a club that regularly shoots clout for a quick drop of tuition.
 


ben tarrow

Active member
I've attended enough clouts to know what archers have to do. But I wondered if AGB had some special instructions that they require to be delivered.
Its absolute basic tuition, so the the archer has some idea of what they're going to do. Its not GCSE rocket science.

IT would be truely terrible if this "tuition prior to " requirement gets blown out of proportion (like AGB insurance) to the point where potential clout archers are put off trying this interesting discipline
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Thanks all for the help.
It seems from what has been said, that there are no " clearly defined " instructions that must be given. So, it isn't a case of; I haven't found the instructions; so much as there aren't any.
Ben, I agree with you about the interesting discipline. Very helpful for archers who are getting too serious about details and losing the bigger picture of being able to shoot with a freedom of movement( not a cramped up style.)
I understand that first time clout archers will need some help with knowing what goes on and how. I feel better about delivering that, now.
 


Corax67

Active member
Hi Geoff - the tagged thread above was mine

The basis of the instruction is to ensure that all archers using sighted bows do not draw at an excessive angle to the horizontal for safety, too high and it turns into flight rather than clout :)

Longbow, for example, can draw whilst aiming at whatever bit of sky they feel fit but then that’s mostly what we do anyway.

Sussex Archery have this fabulous guide to clout on their website :


Check out page 6 for a great illustration and details of recommended maximum elevations for each bow style which I think is what you are after.


Karl
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi Karl,
Thanks for that. The same link was sent to me last night direct to my email and I didn't see your post till a minute ago.
It is a great document. And thank you for your efforts.
Out of interest.... what does "Tagged Thread" mean? I have heard the expression before but never bothered to find out what it means.
 


Corax67

Active member
Tagged thread - a previously discussed topic (thread) to which someone has put a link within a different thread (tagged) so you can go straight to it rather than searching for it.

Loved the two clout shoots I did last year, so good to see stick and string on an equal footing to those sighted foofy bows 😁


Karl
 


Corax67

Active member
Out of interest what bow style are your club members shooting?

Had some fabulous discussions on arrow selection before the first clout that made a huge impact on my sessions, my standard arrows would have got me a score but a loan set (clout 1) had me make a set of my own modified set for clout 2.

Tapered a set of 5/16 shafts along two thirds to 9/32 at point with 63gn brass taper fit points and hand cut 1.5” inch feather fletchings plus hand cut nocks (bearpaw jig) - awesome arrows


Karl
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi Karl. Thanks for the clarification.
We will have longbows, barebow recurves, recurves. flatbows and compounds.
I think clout shooting is one of the best ways to learn how to shoot any bow. I am not saying that it isn't without risks; specially compound and a beginner, But, get that explained and let the beginners aim with the arrow point at the flag., in the middle of a huge field and let them feel the freedom of movement that comes with so few restrictions for the mind to fret about.
 


AndyW

Active member
The part of interest to me was that compounds are allowed with AGB. Whenever our club has run clout I've been specifically told that you're not allowed to shoot compound. Never thought to look in the rules. I don't think i'd want to shoot one with normal fletch but maybe flu flus would be doable - i suspect the arrows would bury at low angle.
 


AndyW

Active member
I'm not AGB. NFAS, - I haven't gotten around to checking but I've never heard of anyone doing clout with compound, in fact the only time our club has done it is a boxing day clout. I think it's more of a wood thing with the longbow/primitive crowd seeming to be more keen.
I always sort of mean to go to the multi society flight events but never seem to get around to it - one of my bows did but it wasn't accompanied by me it had been borrowed.
 


Shirt

Active member
My club has enough space to practice clout once a month or so. However, while there is enough overshoot there's not enough for us as a club to feel comfortable about new compounds experimenting here... It's very easy to overcook it a bit and go significantly past the flag.

As a quick and easy intro to clout though:
Recurves shooting their normal target stuff, aim higher than you think you need to.
Compounds shooting their normal target stuff, aim lower than you think you need to. Starting point would be anchor as normal, centre the point in the peep, then put the point on the flag. This will make the distance. (In my case, using this approach for the first clout I'd ever done with a compound put me about 20m past it)
 


At its most basic the instruction is about safety, ie not overshooting. many novices will have seen pictures of longbow clout and assume that all bows must be elevated thus when the actual elevation of a 30# recurve is around 20 deg and a compound is around 15 deg.
My barebow aiming point with a 35# draw is just below the bottom of my hand so where the riser swells for the handgrip.
Stance is important to ensure your shoulders are perpendicular to the spine hence the bending of the rear leg.
I tend to demonstrate this when giving instruction by using my longbow as the more visible methodology. Most people pick it up by the time they have shot an end under a watchful eye.

Now at my club compounds are barred due to problems with overshoot thanks to someone who just wouldnt be told many years ago but all it needs is a bit of common sense and maybe some maths applied when you put your sights on the bow for the first time.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Yes, the opportunity for a compound to MISS the field is ever present.
Having said that, at a clout some years ago, a recurve archer missed the field. This was on a field that had 100+ yds spare beyond and to each side.
At the time, one of the archers searching the grass was heard to exclaim, "How can you miss a field this size?!!"
Well, the answer turned out to be not so difficult. It was up a tree to one side of the scoring zone.
 


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