[English Longbow] Longbow: height of nocking point

Anglian Archer

New member
Hi,

I was browsing the FITA intermediate coaching manual for longbow (does anyone know who wrote this, btw?) and it said that a high nocking point could result in erratic arrow releases. Any tips on judging the best height for a nocking point?

Also, I understand that some archers prefer to nock their arrow below the nocking point rather than above it (assuming you have a single point and not a pair). Are there advantages to this?

Thanks
 

Berny

Member
Nock point should be high enough so arrow clears your bow hand on loose so don't get feather burn or feather-in-the-finger-knuckle.
Handle wrap &/or arrow pass if present should indicate correct place for hand & hence arrow on hand & nock on string should be higher.
Exact height is part of your "bow tuning" along with brace-height & may 1/8" - to 1/4" or poss. higher depending on tiller of bow, style of bow,
presence of handle/wrap/arrow pass.

Single nocking point & nock under is simple gravity & rotational theory to stop arrow nock slipping up the string as it potentially
pivots about your knuckle under the weight of the pile. Tight nocks may prevent this at the expense of clean loose/departure of arrow
from string.

Hi,

I was browsing the FITA intermediate coaching manual for longbow (does anyone know who wrote this, btw?) and it said that a high nocking point could result in erratic arrow releases. Any tips on judging the best height for a nocking point?

Also, I understand that some archers prefer to nock their arrow below the nocking point rather than above it (assuming you have a single point and not a pair). Are there advantages to this?

Thanks
 

Simon Banks

New member
Having just shot in a new longbow I just used a single dental floss nock until it settled in..
Through trail and error I got the right height that worked for me.. I don't get and feather burns or cuts now..

If heard using medical or PVC tape as a temporary nock is a good way of finding the right spot works well.. Personally I quite enjoy putting nocking points on and need the practice ;-)
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Of course, with a longbow a high bow hand can cause the same problem as a low nocking point.
The arrow flight isn't much of a problem unless the nocking point is absolutely miles out. the weight of the point and the flights are there to sort get the arrow flying straight. The archers paradox (The arrow having to flex round to get past the bow) is far more significant than a few mm up or down on the nocking point.
Del
 

Anglian Archer

New member
I was mooching round the Internet and came across some advice from Pip Bickerstaff on the subject. His opinion is that the nocking point should be at least 1/4" above horizontal, but no more than 1/2". He advises changing the nocking point at the first thing to try when faced with erratic arrows.

In contrast, Toxophilus advises a horizontal nocking.
 

Simon Banks

New member
I was mooching round the Internet and came across some advice from Pip Bickerstaff on the subject. His opinion is that the nocking point should be at least 1/4" above horizontal, but no more than 1/2". He advises changing the nocking point at the first thing to try when faced with erratic arrows.

In contrast, Toxophilus advises a horizontal nocking.
Depends if your wearing a bow glove ;-)
 

BillM

Member
I have found that the nocking point on my longbow needs to be about 10mm above horizontal to get clearance and stop feathers hitting my hand - and yes, I wear a glove. In comparison, the nocking point on my recurve is 7mm.

BillM
 

Anglian Archer

New member
I've now repositioned the nocking point to 10mm above horizontal. It had been a little over 20mm.

Hopefully it will make a difference. I'm getting a bit tired of watching my arrows twirl about like shuttlecocks.
 

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
I often read about the height of the nocking point and usually the author fails to state whether they are talking about the top of the bottom nock or the bottom of the top nock! I usually assume (which I should not do really) it is the top of the bottom nock.
 

Raven's_Eye

Active member
Ironman
I have my nocking point (top of the bottom nock) at about 1/8" (just over 4mm) above the horizontal.
 
Top