[English Longbow] Longbow set

Cho Ng

New member
How normal is it for a longbow to begin taking set(hope that is correct)about 8 months from new? It's only slight at the moment but I just want to know if I'm not treating my bow correctly as it was dead straight when I first got it.
 
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Del the Cat

Well-known member
Any bow which is made straight will end up with some set.
If you put it up against a straight edge like a wall with the belly towards the straight edge, if you can get one finger between grip and wall that's fine, two fingers is ok, more than that, I'd say it's taking rather a lot of set.
But what you want to bear in mind is set is better than chrysals or a broken bow. It also shows the bow is working near it's limit which is how it should be. A bow that doesn't take a little set isn't work ing hard enough IMO.
And before some one blethers on about bows that still have an inch of reflex... That's probably because they started out with 2" of reflex!
Del
 

Berny

Member
Amongst other things I would suggest that the bow spec: what it's made of & how its made
& how many arrows & how you shoot it may affect how your bow goes.

Self or laminated?, if latter how many &
What materials?
Length of bow & dimensions?
What draw weight & length tillered to? ....& do you keep to it?
Reputation of bowyer? feedback from bowyer on your observation

On shooting style - I see a lot of longbow archers doing T-draw, with under-chin & 3 point anchor, long hold, before loose.
Was the bow intended to be shot this way?
Was if offered as a target/field/general shooting bow or a clout bow?
Do you shoot clout with a "slashing" loose - was it made for this?

Friend of mine had a tri-lam made for him last year, not sure of lams, but think it was hickory/purpleheart/lemonwood.
Started taking set from beginning, end up at 3", after say 3 months, & draw weight nowhere near the #65 specified.

Same friend had another made by a different bowyer about 2 months ago, #65, tri-lam, not sure what lams,
developed chrysals in weeks 1-2. Pending bowyer inspection & response.

I know Del's a bowyer & may be able to comment on the reported current shortage of good quality bow making wood / laminations
especially e.g. lemonwood.

Current bow i'm shooting : boo/boo/ipe #[email protected]" has about 1" of set after shooting tonight, not sure if it drops after it's rested though,
never checked it as it looks & shoots pretty much the same since I've had it.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Some commercial bows are not fully shot in when they are sold and thus set and problems can develop.
I only do a few self bows each year for the love of it and have time to shoot 'em in. (e.g last year I prob made a dozen in total)
The first time I realised the need was when a bow developed a weak lower limb after several weeks and a lot of arrows. If I hadn't known it's exact history and usage I'd have guessed it had been trodden on, over drawn or badly strung.
That taught me a vauable lesson, I've since had the odd one show a crack or lift a splinter, I even had a splice give out and the bow fold up in my hand!
These were all repairable, I've also had bows chrysal, generally these are destined for the 'corner of shame' or occasional use, although very minor chrysalling can remain unchanged and be ok. Personally I hate chrysals with a pasion and my heart sinks if I see or feel one. I'd much rather have a bit of set.
It would be interesting to hear from a maker of laminated bows, but I wouldn't have thought there was much excuse for a laminated bow chrysalling or failing as you effectively get to choose and see the wood at every point throughout the limbs. However I'd think the odd glue line problem is probably to be expected.
Del
 

ghound

New member
My bow seems to have a glue line issue, it's got a 2cm long line appearing between the bamboo laminate which i can fit a bit of paper into.
I'm not sure if it will get any worse, but it certainly won't get any better and it kind of spoils a perfect looking bow. I'm waiting to hear back from the bowyer as to how i can fix it.
 

Raven's_Eye

Active member
Ironman
My bow doesn't seem to have a glue line issue, it's got a 2cm long line appearing between the bamboo laminate which i can fit a bit of paper into.
I'm not sure if it will get any worse, but it certainly won't get any better and it kind of spoils a perfect looking bow. I'm waiting to hear back from the bowyer as to how i can fix it.
That is delamination, stop using it. Best bet is send it back to the bowyer and he'll probably have to take the strip off and reglue. I had one of those, and if you try and put glue in teh crack because it being a small gap it'll just sit on the surface and not sink in.
 

ghound

New member
Just waiting to here back from him, though it couldn't come at a worse time as i am settled with the bow, and thee's big comps coming up !!
 

DavidH

New member
That is delamination, stop using it. Best bet is send it back to the bowyer and he'll probably have to take the strip off and reglue. I had one of those, and if you try and put glue in teh crack because it being a small gap it'll just sit on the surface and not sink in.
This of course could be a plot to stop you shooting so well;) Naaah, he's right
 
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