Compound Bow Mike Schloesser - punches the release aid?

jerryRTD

Well-known member
Are there not two issues being mixed here? TP is apprehension of the shot taking place when the arrow not in the middle of the gold, developing into releasing too early or not being able to acquire a stable sight position. And a flinch which is the release not activating the second the archer expects it to following a commanded execution and the body begins the follow through.
IO would add another cause of flinch ,drifting off the back wall. The main cause of that is lack of back tension A major factor in just about every type of TP is lack of back tension.
 

KidCurry

Well-known member
IO would add another cause of flinch ,drifting off the back wall. The main cause of that is lack of back tension A major factor in just about every type of TP is lack of back tension.
Lack of back tension is definitely an issue, probably for far more archers that TP or flinching put together. But I think lack of back tension is primarily due to too much focus on the aim and release. How much it is part of the cause, I haven't really considered it. When I shot compound I often came off the wall due to too much aim, but it never caused any issues other than a high arrow impact. Having said that, focusing on back tension instead of the aim may sort out many TP issues taking attention away from aiming.
I wonder how many people shooting instinctive, and I use the term only for want of a better one, suffer target panic :)
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Interesting question about instinctive shooters.
I would guess that TP is far more likely to happen to archers who shoot with "time to spare". In other words, with time to think about too much, or too many items. Over aiming, for example, might allow time to think about when to do the next bit. Then they forget something that they were doing; without thinking in words about it.
 
Far be it from me to criticise his technique (given the results it delivers!), but watching this recent footage I couldn't help but notice that Mike Schloesser seems to punch the heck out of his release aid on every shot. Looks to me like his thumb hovers over the barrel/trigger, gradually 'approaches' it in a series of little jerks, and then as soon as he actually touches it - BAM - he depresses (punches?) it fully and the shot is gone.

You can see it very clearly here (at 1:40, for example):

Am I right? does he always shoot like this?

chemistry
There are a number of compound release shooters who punch their release aids ... successfully. (I use as a criterion for a surprise release is that the coach should not be able to see the finger or thumb move to trip the release.) Those who can shoot with a conscious release, I think Tim Gillingham is another, have a particular personality that can pull this off. Those people seem to be rare. The rest of us just get target panic through anticipation of the release tripping. As a matter of course, when I teach release aids, I default to a surprise/unconscious release, if for no other reasons than it is more likely to work and if the archer wants to try the other approach, it is easier going from unconscious to conscious than vice-versa.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Steve I am not a fan of punching the release , for the same reasons as you I feel.
I wonder, though, if the reason punching is so often seen as "not best practice" could have something to do with that method being learnt in error by some archers, and learnt badly.
Could I have been saved from severe target panic if I had been taught properly to make sure I was still pulling when I triggered the shot, as opposed to triggering and losing back tension through ignorance of the fact?
 

garethochse

New member
Are there not two issues being mixed here? TP is apprehension of the shot taking place when the arrow not in the middle of the gold, developing into releasing too early or not being able to acquire a stable sight position. And a flinch which is the release not activating the second the archer expects it to following a commanded execution and the body begins the follow through.
they're one and the same issue - TP - both symptoms you describe originate with the archer anticipating the release. For 99% of people, a great shot will come from being able to settle on target (back tension, technique, trusting your aim etc) and then executing a great shot without anticipation (focus on speed and control of release v aiming). There are a few who can get onto target and then 'dynamically' execute their release, but that's a freedom they earn from superb technique - quick sight pic, steady aim, consistent release - and perhaps a different personality type. For us mortals, learn to shoot every shot by surprise.
 
Last edited:

jerryRTD

Well-known member
they're one and the same issue - TP - both symptoms you describe originate with the archer anticipating the release. For 99% of people, a great shot will come from being able to settle on target (back tension, technique, trusting your aim etc) and then executing a great shot without anticipation (focus on speed and control of release v aiming). There are a few who can get onto target and then 'dynamically' execute their release, but that's a freedom they earn from superb technique - quick sight pic, steady aim, consistent release - and perhaps a different personality type. For us mortals, learn to shoot every shot by surprise.
I don't agree with your figure of 99% probably nearer 75%. maybe more .
As for you mortals , some of you can learn to command shoot, as you have said. settle on target, back tension. aim, .Once you have got to that point it does not matter how the release is done command or surprise the bow is aligned the arrow will hit the spot.
I did not realise at the time but the the thing that helped me was to learn to shoot compound limited. off fingers you have to keep the back tension on or you don't get a clean loose. Because the opening of the fingers takes mental effort you always know when you are going to loose the arrow. you have to command it to happen.
How long did you try using a wrist release. before you got a hand held?
 
Top