Nocks for my navigators

Hudzi93

New member
Hi, I have 610 navigators with pin nocks. After having a look around I found that navigators spine 610-1000 take ace pins (I bought the arrows second hand so I didn't know this). I've just ordered up some beiter in-out nocks but I can't understand why they have different nock sizes for the 610 navs and aces considering that the navs take the ace pins.

Also, what's the best way of removing the pins? I'm not sure if they've been glued in or not.

Thanks
 

johnnybeta

Member
Ironman
the inner diameter of the nav and ace shafts in that size range is, as I understand things, the same because both shafts use the same Al core. The outer diameter will be different though, due to the carbon layers on the ace being barrelled, whereas they're straight/parallel on the navigator - hence the need for a different diameters on the "out" part of the in-out nock.

You could keep your pins and fit beiter pin nocks (available from at least one of this forum's sponsors), instead of the in-out nocks. If it's too late, or you don't fancy that, then the pins are most likely held in with hot melt. Gently heat the pin (I use a cigarette lighter or a tea light depending how posh I'm feeling) to soften the glue and then pull the pins out with pliers.
 

Hudzi93

New member
Ah, that explains it. I'm not too keen on pin nocks and would rather have nocks that go directly into the shaft. Is the shaft safe under a lighter? I've heard hot water works as well..
 

johnnybeta

Member
Ironman
mine have been ok so far using a lighter - you want to minimise the amount of heat applied obviously - just enough to melt the glue. some also recommend quenching the arrows in a jug of cold water as soon as you've done - but then of course in your situation you'd possibly be waiting for the insides of the shafts to dry out before you could fit your new nocks. I've never tried using hot water for hot melting - I suppose it'll depend on exactly what hot melt was used.
 

johnnybeta

Member
Ironman
possibly - I scrape out any residue with a needle file, obviously trying not to file any metal from the actual shaft.
 

wingate_52

New member
I remove my pins in a cup of hot water, and any residue with a small dia brass wire brush, heated in the water.
 

Vagabond

New member
If I leave them in hot water for a couple of minutes will I be able to pull them out just using my fingers?
Yes if it's low-temperature hot-melt (and you are not too sensitive): hot water is enough to soften this.
No if high-temperature hot melt: will need a flame to get it hot enough.

V
 

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
I'm not a great fan of the in-out design. I'm not convinced that they give more protection than normal "heavy" insert Beiter nocks. They just make things a bit more fiddly.

I do think that the "heavy" colours of Beiter nock (in-out or normal insert) give a significant amount of protection to the rear end of the shaft.
 

Hudzi93

New member
I'm not a great fan of the in-out design. I'm not convinced that they give more protection than normal "heavy" insert Beiter nocks. They just make things a bit more fiddly.

I do think that the "heavy" colours of Beiter nock (in-out or normal insert) give a significant amount of protection to the rear end of the shaft.
Well it was a bit of a tough decision between the insert nocks and the in-out nocks. I could possibly cancel the order. I paid ?15 for a dozen in-out nocks and I can get 25 insert nocks for the same price so I'm actually considering it now. What do you think?
 

jimlee

New member
Ah, that explains it. I'm not too keen on pin nocks and would rather have nocks that go directly into the shaft. Is the shaft safe under a lighter? I've heard hot water works as well..
If you use a flame to heat the pins don't apply the heat directly to the shaft as it will ruin the carbon, heat the end of the pin and let the heat transfer to the glue that way.

Cheers, Jim.
 

Hudzi93

New member
If you use a flame to heat the pins don't apply the heat directly to the shaft as it will ruin the carbon, heat the end of the pin and let the heat transfer to the glue that way.

Cheers, Jim.
Thanks, I wouldn't have know that if you hadn't told me and I might've ruined the end of the shaft!! Anyway, I'll try the hot water first as it seems safer and I'll try to keep the carbon out of the water too.
 

Hudzi93

New member
By the way, I cancelled my order for the in-outs and went to a different website for the insert nocks at ?14.70 for 25 nocks delivered. I phone them up to see if I could add the beiter push-n-pull and it turned out that they had neither that nor the nocks in stock so I eventually got them ordered elsewhere, although it cost me a bit more per nock but I only bought a dozen. A bit of a shenanigans really!!
 

Hudzi93

New member
My nocks have arrived and there's a '1' on each of them. I'm assuming the '1' goes on the bottom when installing the nocks?
 

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
My nocks have arrived and there's a '1' on each of them. I'm assuming the '1' goes on the bottom when installing the nocks?
Well, the two goes underneath, on mine.
But look at them from the side. The side pieces are not symmetric.
They slope downwards more on the top. Flatter on the bottom.
 

Hudzi93

New member
Thanks, it is actually quite obvious when I look at it properly. They fit in the shaft pretty well and have a consistent fit contrary to what I've heard. I'm quite happy with then. I've not had a chance to shoot with them yet though.
 

Hudzi93

New member
Another question guys...I have 11 arrows, two of which are bare shafts (both slightly bent). Out of the other 9, 3 of them appear to be slightly bent near the tip and the remaining 6 arrows seem good. I'm thinking of keeping these 6 arrows for competitions and such and using the 3 slightly bent shafts at the club. Do you think that would be the best way to do it? Is it possible to straighten out the bent arrows using an arrow straightener is is that only for aluminium arrows?
 
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