Nocks, which one and why?

dottorfoggy

Member
after shooting a while, i'm thinking to understand which nocks work better and are more durable.
i've tried beiter nock and pin-nock, the first one with a 37# bow and the second with 43#
-from the standard beiter nock i dind't get any big failure, just on some of them, a noticeable bend, some other broken inside for a hit from another arrows, some time hard to remove from the inside of the shaft
-from the pin-nock, i have to say, are good to save the shaft if hitted by another arrow but look more fragile, the transparent color (green and red in my case) are easy to check for a small crack but they brake easily.... the solid color instead (white) looks more durable, but they "explode" directly without any noticeable crack or somethings else
i'm looking for somethings more durable and easy to interchange, outnock looks really great for that, any suggestion?

ps. i was looking last week how many arrows i' ve shoot in the last year, 25k, maybe is just the avg failure to report on the nocks

from monday, with the white pin nocks :knockout:
20196256_10213932761743497_1036310278_o.jpg
 

Aleatorian

Member
After trying them, my personal preference has always been Beiter Nocks, in whichever variant fit the arrow I was shooting. When it was with the recurve this was paired with the Beiter Nock Point, I found these nocks consistent and quite durable. I always made note to check my nocks after each end and give them a little attempt at twisting, if they moved easily on the pin I removed and replaced them.
Now I've switched Bowstyle I've stuck with the Beiter nocks, but using the "Heavy" coloured pin nocks, I find they give me a grip I like on the string.

25k is a considerable amount of arrows! Though last year I did total around 15k, and will be looking close to 20k this year, and not seeing many failures.
 

dvd8n

Supporter
Supporter
I never got on with Beiter pin nocks.

They gave me a really nice consistent release that I liked but the durability was frankly terrible. I found that I was losing a nock every few ends. Which was annoying when you noticed, and painful and a point loser when you didn't.

My theory was that they were starting to crack from the instant that you pushed them onto the pin.

I don't know why Beiter have this issue; other manufacturers seem to be able to manufacture a nock with some durability.
 

Senlac

Supporter
Supporter
Yes, Beither pin nocks work well for me, no reliability or breakage probs even after thousands of uses per arrow. Dayglo green show up very well in the scope at 100y.
25k arrows/year is a lot. I shoot 4 days/week and average 12k per year i.e. 1000/month (for a while I was at 1600/month). Professional archers shoot about 50k/yr i.e. 1000/week. Some top Koreans shoot 500/day when on the job but have weekends off.
 

backinblack

Active member
Beiter in-out nocks in the "heavy" material, because I use the Beiter nock point on my string, I've never lost an X10 to a robin hood with one and I've never had one crack.

I've used Beiter out nocks but not in the "heavy" material - I found a tendency for them to crack around the lip on the end that fits onto the arrow and I wasn't happy that they weren't about to let go in a big way. That might have been me being too enthusiastic pushing them onto the arrows though - I'm particularly ham fisted and the arrows I used them on didn't have consistent outer diametres so some needed a bit more help than others.

- - - Updated - - -

Beiter in-out nocks in the "heavy" material, because I use the Beiter nock point on my string, I've never lost an X10 to a robin hood with one and I've never had one crack.

I've used Beiter out nocks but not in the "heavy" material - I found a tendency for them to crack around the lip on the end that fits onto the arrow and I wasn't happy that they weren't about to let go in a big way. That might have been me being too enthusiastic pushing them onto the arrows though - I'm particularly ham fisted and the arrows I used them on didn't have consistent outer diametres so some needed a bit more help than others.
 

dottorfoggy

Member
In the last period, before island games my avg was 800-900/week and this winter was busy from my work, not so much time to train. We are lucky to train how much we want.
Btw I will keep more attention after every end, I'm already doing that but not so much meticulous.
From april I have already changed +/- 20 pin nock. All was transparent, now I have only heavy color.
Soon I will upgrade my ace to x10 probably, my 33" draw is just on the edge for the ace and I want to try out if can help me on the 90mt with wind
Just to understand which nock I'm going to use with
 

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
Beiter in-out nocks in the "heavy" material, because I use the Beiter nock point on my string, I've never lost an X10 to a robin hood with one and I've never had one crack.

I've used Beiter out nocks but not in the "heavy" material - I found a tendency for them to crack around the lip on the end that fits onto the arrow and I wasn't happy that they weren't about to let go in a big way. That might have been me being too enthusiastic pushing them onto the arrows though - I'm particularly ham fisted and the arrows I used them on didn't have consistent outer diametres so some needed a bit more help than others.

- - - Updated - - -

Beiter in-out nocks in the "heavy" material, because I use the Beiter nock point on my string, I've never lost an X10 to a robin hood with one and I've never had one crack.

I've used Beiter out nocks but not in the "heavy" material - I found a tendency for them to crack around the lip on the end that fits onto the arrow and I wasn't happy that they weren't about to let go in a big way. That might have been me being too enthusiastic pushing them onto the arrows though - I'm particularly ham fisted and the arrows I used them on didn't have consistent outer diametres so some needed a bit more help than others.
Beiter don't actually make out-nocks in "heavy"... no idea why.
I've never used pin nocks, but find Beiter ACE nocks and in-outs to be more than adequately durable, in the heavy colours. So far as I recall, all the in-outs are "heavy".
 

Andy!

Member
I thought I'd bring this up just in case.
If you find that your nocks seem to be fine, but are splitting along the mould lines, this is caused by the nock actually seating hard into flat ridge at the base of the pin during the power stroke.

If this doesn't make sense, pop a pin nock off.
Put your finger on the end of the pin.

This is the place that should take almost all of the driving force of the bow string. The load is transferred by the matching internal face at the end of the hole in the pin nock and all is good.

If you are using a nock which is not made by the same manufacturer of the pin, if those two faces don't meet to transfer the load, the force will instead be transferred through the nock base, which will be resting on the pin ridge.
It makes them reliably split.
Just be warned that they will look absolutely fine at close inspection when installed.
But they'll crack within a few shots if you're up near the end of the 60lb limit.

- - - Updated - - -

I thought I'd bring this up just in case.
If you find that your nocks seem to be fine, but are splitting along the mould lines, this is caused by the nock actually seating hard into flat ridge at the base of the pin during the power stroke.

If this doesn't make sense, pop a pin nock off.
Put your finger on the end of the pin.

This is the place that should take almost all of the driving force of the bow string. The load is transferred by the matching internal face at the end of the hole in the pin nock and all is good.

If you are using a nock which is not made by the same manufacturer of the pin, if those two faces don't meet to transfer the load, the force will instead be transferred through the nock base, which will be resting on the pin ridge.
It makes them reliably split.
Just be warned that they will look absolutely fine at close inspection when installed.
But they'll crack within a few shots if you're up near the end of the 60lb limit.
 

dvd8n

Supporter
Supporter
I thought I'd bring this up just in case.
If you find that your nocks seem to be fine, but are splitting along the mould lines, this is caused by the nock actually seating hard into flat ridge at the base of the pin during the power stroke.

If this doesn't make sense, pop a pin nock off.
Put your finger on the end of the pin.

This is the place that should take almost all of the driving force of the bow string. The load is transferred by the matching internal face at the end of the hole in the pin nock and all is good.

If you are using a nock which is not made by the same manufacturer of the pin, if those two faces don't meet to transfer the load, the force will instead be transferred through the nock base, which will be resting on the pin ridge.
It makes them reliably split.
Just be warned that they will look absolutely fine at close inspection when installed.
But they'll crack within a few shots if you're up near the end of the 60lb limit.
That's interesting. It could certainly explain why others have little problem with the durability of Beiter nocks and I found them so poor.
 
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