Old sniper trick : use the tall finger on the trigger.

My grandfather was a horse soldier, and among the secrets he imparted to his son, my father, was which finger to use on the trigger. Our primate brain knows where the index finger is pointed, even in the dark. This makes it perfect for target acquisition, but not dispatch. Perhaps that's why it has so many veins and nerves. The tall finger has far fewer. Some say it has no pulse, but they're wrong. It's faint but there. It's far fainter than the pulse in the index finger. This is the perfect trigger finger. No more buck fever! Lay the index finger alongside the weapon, handgun or long gun, acquire a good sight picture, and squeeze off a killshot with the tall finger. The prey is lying on the forest floor with Xs for eyes. Those shooters who use a release on their bow find the score goes up.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Interesting stuff. I have seen archers using that finger with a release aid. It also helps with getting a stable draw hand when using a wrist strap release.
Jerry RTD uses that finger ,I think.
 
My grandfather was a horse soldier, and among the secrets he imparted to his son, my father, was which finger to use on the trigger. Our primate brain knows where the index finger is pointed, even in the dark. This makes it perfect for target acquisition, but not dispatch. Perhaps that's why it has so many veins and nerves. The tall finger has far fewer. Some say it has no pulse, but they're wrong. It's faint but there. It's far fainter than the pulse in the index finger. This is the perfect trigger finger. No more buck fever! Lay the index finger alongside the weapon, handgun or long gun, acquire a good sight picture, and squeeze off a killshot with the tall finger. The prey is lying on the forest floor with Xs for eyes. Those shooters who use a release on their bow find the score goes up.
How does that work with a 'Mediterranean' style?
 

bobnewboy

Member
Middle and ring fingers holding the string under the nock, index finger just straightened but touching the string and top of the arrow nock, in order to comply with shooting rules for Med release classes.
 

Corax67

Well-known member
It’s an interesting thought - in all my days of weapon shooting which has covered live fire pistols & rifles, shotguns, air rifles and pistols I have never once come across a shooter who used this style.

Without fail every single one used their index finger on the trigger and for competition disciplines such as 6m pistol or 10m rifle or Field Target the trigger blades are adjustable in 4 axis to ensure a straight line draw along the direction of the weapons motion is maintained.

However because my interest is now piqued I shall definitely be putting it to the test later this week as I have to re-zero my Walther PCP to carry out a bit of pest control on the weekend.



Karl
 

Hawkmoon

Member
I don't think it would really apply to shooting off the fingers, the ideal release is a release not a pull, the aim is to relax the fingers and allow the string to slip off. But still an interesting idea.
 

Kernowlad

Active member
Well I do this but more by fluke than anything else.
I used to shoot a lot too; TBH I was better at it than I will ever be at archery but I like a challenge!
 

jerryRTD

Active member
Interesting stuff. I have seen archers using that finger with a release aid. It also helps with getting a stable draw hand when using a wrist strap release.
Jerry RTD uses that finger ,I think.
Indeed I do, It allows me to use the index knuckle to anchor just below the ear on the back of the jaw bone.
 

bobnewboy

Member
Well, I was shown and recommended this by an NFAS champ who used to shoot NFAS longbow and barebow (finger/med release compound) classes. He always used this method when shooting med release, and he was really a very good and consistent shot. Maybe it improves consistency by reducing the impact of finger placement on the string.....or perhaps its the avoidance of nock pinch.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Middle and ring fingers holding the string under the nock, index finger just straightened but touching the string and top of the arrow nock, in order to comply with shooting rules for Med release classes.
I shot recurve, for several years using that method. But, I would say it is a method of drawing the bow or a way to hold the string, which avoids nock pinch and a sore index finger. I wouldn't describe it as a way to trigger a shot with a recurve. There's no trigger to activate with the tall finger; plus, there are two fingers on the string holding the weight, not just that one.
 
Well, I was shown and recommended this by an NFAS champ who used to shoot NFAS longbow and barebow (finger/med release compound) classes. He always used this method when shooting med release, and he was really a very good and consistent shot. Maybe it improves consistency by reducing the impact of finger placement on the string.....or perhaps its the avoidance of nock pinch.

I may try it. I shoot a horsebow so nock pinch is something I need to try to avoid.
 

AndyW

Well-known member
It's quite a popular release with compound off fingers. The index finger is straight and touching nock the middle and ring finger do the work. Makes for a cleaner release if you can do it. When shooting unsighted field it also brings the eye closer to the arrow by anchoring with the middle finger instead of the index helping with POA and sighting down the shaft. Personally I can't make myself do it as I think it's unsafe in case you have to come down.
 

KidCurry

Well-known member
Middle finger release is used a lot for wrist release on compound, helps prevent punching/twitching. I don't see the advantage with recurve, maybe finger release compound. The issues I see with this release for recurve is the weight loading. Most weight is taken on the forefinger and middle finger. This weight is now taken all on the low two fingers, the lower being further away from the nock than the forefinger was. Secondly, as has been pointed out, there are no muscles used to release the string. Oh... thirdly you will need a tiller change away from the recurve ideal.
opps... just reading the op, it has nothing to do with recurve :)
 

TJ Mason

Soaring
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
American Shoot
It's also a good tip when using a saw - lay the index finger against the side of the saw rather than wrapping it around the handle, and you'll tend to cut straighter.
 

little-else

Supporter
Supporter
It is done because all of your finger tendons work when you move one finger so to brace the index finger against something means there is less overall movement of the other fingers so you get less snatching.
Another precision trigger release used for benchrest shooting and sniping is to squeeze the trigger towards the rear of the trigger guard using index finger and thumb which presses on the back of the trigger guard. This has the effect of again limiting tendon movment by the pinching action as none of the rest of the hand makes contact with the rifle. Best used with the gun on a bipod and holding the butt into the shoulder with the left hand so lh elbow supports the rifle to create a tripod No equivalent for that though.
 

4d4m

Member
Another precision trigger release used for benchrest shooting and sniping is to squeeze the trigger towards the rear of the trigger guard using index finger and thumb which presses on the back of the trigger guard. This has the effect of again limiting tendon movment by the pinching action as none of the rest of the hand makes contact with the rifle. Best used with the gun on a bipod and holding the butt into the shoulder with the left hand so lh elbow supports the rifle to create a tripod No equivalent for that though.
I shoot FT with airguns, mainly springers, and I use exactly this pinch movement, except it's not pressing against the back of the trigger guard but part of the stock at the rear of the action. All my custom target stocks have a shelf for a "thumb up" position. For springers especially though, holding the butt into the shoulder with any kind of muscle tension is highly undesirable.
 

4d4m

Member
I understood the "trick" was more for speed than accuracy. Soldiers using bolt action rifles like the SMLE in WW1 using the middle finger for the trigger, could keep first finger and thumb on the bolt handle for very rapid reloads. British soldiers practiced the "mad minute", at least 15 aimed shots in a minute including two magazine reloads.
 

jerryRTD

Active member
It is done because all of your finger tendons work when you move one finger so to brace the index finger against something means there is less overall movement of the other fingers so you get less snatching.
Another precision trigger release used for benchrest shooting and sniping is to squeeze the trigger towards the rear of the trigger guard using index finger and thumb which presses on the back of the trigger guard. This has the effect of again limiting tendon movment by the pinching action as none of the rest of the hand makes contact with the rifle. Best used with the gun on a bipod and holding the butt into the shoulder with the left hand so lh elbow supports the rifle to create a tripod No equivalent for that though.
That may be how it works for you but not for me. My index and middle finger are independent of each other and the two smaller finger. The two smaller fingers are coupled, but not closely.
When I ride my motor bike braking into a corner and changing down a cog requires index and middle finger to do the braking and the other two fingers to blip the throttle on the down change. Thus the two smaller finger have to operate independently .
 
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