RECURVE : Anyone use a Free Flyte rest in drop away mode?

Matt Francis

New member
Getting back into shooting and looking at my kit while I wait. I have a Cavalier Free Flyte micro that allows you to either use it as a flipper or by reversing the magnet have it so that the rest gets pulled into the bow on launch.

Question : Does anyone use a rest like this for recurve? I understand the theory but isnt there a danger that the rest will close on its own, if for example you let down from full draw or something similar?

I assume it must be safe otherwise it wouldn't be sold but would be good to heard from anyone that has one.
 


Mufti

Member
Ask yourself is it necessary?
Look at slow motion videos of arrows as they pass the rest . . .

One assumes all these moving parts are to cater for poor shots.

Am I unique having a solid metal bar for a rest?
Image1.jpg
 


mk1

It's an X
Supporter
As long as there is the weight of an arrow on it it will stay out. I always used it the "conventional" way though as less of a phaff as you need to tweak the rest wire out for the arrow to sit on it. I had the bent up bit on the end clipped off. Later I even had it trimmed so that it was a short as it could be rather than angled so it didn't stick out and it made not the slightest bit of difference to my results :)
 


Timid Toad

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
Ironman
Ask yourself is it necessary?
Look at slow motion videos of arrows as they pass the rest . . .

One assumes all these moving parts are to cater for poor shots.

Am I unique having a solid metal bar for a rest?
There's the Beiter rest, of course.

- - - Updated - - -

Ask yourself is it necessary?
Look at slow motion videos of arrows as they pass the rest . . .

One assumes all these moving parts are to cater for poor shots.

Am I unique having a solid metal bar for a rest?
There's the Beiter rest, of course.
 


buzz lite beer

Well-known member
I've never seen a solid metal rest being used by anyone, a rigid Beiter one yes, but that's plastic. I did use the cavalier in "free flyte" mode quite successfully though some have had issues with it folding as a result of a less than smooth draw or a wobble when trying to get through the clicker.
 


Mark31121

Member
Ironman
I used to use one like that (Switched to either a beiter or a basic plastic rest now). I didn't have any problems with the setup and I found that it helped with clearance at the time, but that wasn't needed after I got some new arrows...
 


BillM

Member
I've had Free Flight Micro on a W+W Infinite for over 12 years and never had any problem with it. That might be something to do with the help I got from Simon Needham setting it up by shortening and tweeking the wire so the arrows left the bow cleanly.

BillM
 


mk1

It's an X
Supporter
I've had Free Flight Micro on a W+W Infinite for over 12 years and never had any problem with it. That might be something to do with the help I got from Simon Needham setting it up by shortening and tweeking the wire so the arrows left the bow cleanly.

BillM

A yes Simon was a master with the wire cutters. Jim Buchanan shotone in "magnet" mode.
 


BillM

Member
A yes Simon was a master with the wire cutters. Jim Buchanan shot one in "magnet" mode.
Ah! I was the one who used the wire cutters (fine saw). Simon merely told me to shorten it to the button and adjust the height to have the arrow on the mid point of the plunger. He did check later that I had done what was needed.

BillM
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
That looks like a simple solution to a rest I made once that fitted via the button hole.
What is the reason behind not having a rigid rest? Is it the idea that fletchings can slip past the wire arms that collapse inwards?
 


joetapley

New member
That looks like a simple solution to a rest I made once that fitted via the button hole.
What is the reason behind not having a rigid rest? Is it the idea that fletchings can slip past the wire arms that collapse inwards?
Vertically rigid rests (like the Beiter or the Hoyt) are not very forgiving to archer variation (vertical arrow to rest forces). People using Beiter used to bend the finger to create a hinge making it less rigid vertically. I tried the Beiter rest when it first came out as superficially it looks like the perfect arrow rest design. Worked fine with fletched arrows but shooting bare shafts with it noticed that periodically you would have an arrow with a significant vertical vibration amplitude in the vertical plane. Consequence of a cr*p release of course and down to the archer, but I need all the help I can get and went back to the ARE. People (not me surprisingly) also often got significant finger wear as a consequence of the rigid finger.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi Joe,
Just out of interest; I watched quite a lot of high speed videos of compounds launching arrows.
The arrow being slightly higher at the nock, starts forwards and presses down onto the rest. The shaft is bending upwards at that stage and after an inch or so, the "bend" is passing the rest and it springs back to the shaft.
When we watch recurve shots of the same thing, we notice the side to side bend, but my guess is that hidden in all that, there will be a similar vertical bend, for the same reason as with compound.
Perhaps the rigid bar in the picture might be better made form something with a bit of flex, but the lack of a mounting system that allows the arm to flip inwards, would make for a reliable rest; simple as the Hoyt Super pro plastic ones.
 


Matt Francis

New member
I've had Free Flight Micro on a W+W Infinite for over 12 years and never had any problem with it. That might be something to do with the help I got from Simon Needham setting it up by shortening and tweeking the wire so the arrows left the bow cleanly.

BillM
How short is your wire? Do you have a bend/hook on the end? I assume the arrow is then "clamped" between the button and clicker
 


BillM

Member
How short is your wire? Do you have a bend/hook on the end? I assume the arrow is then "clamped" between the button and clicker
The wire was cut just forward of the plunger and does not have an upward bend - just straight. I filed the end to remove any burr that was left and merely adjusted the height of the wire so the shaft was level with the plunger tip. I do use a clicker (Beiter) and don't have any problem of the arrow falling off before release.

BillM
 


joetapley

New member
Hi Joe,
Just out of interest; I watched quite a lot of high speed videos of compounds launching arrows.....
Don't know about any measurements but modelling (Ivor Zanevsky) suggests recurve arrow rotation and vibration in the vertical plane during the power stroke (don't notice it so much as the lateral flexing catches the eye) so the arrow is bouncing off the rest (nock point and finger pressure distribution the main instigators as well as the "dynamic tiller" ). You for sure can see the wear marks on the rest from the arrow pressure on it just as you can see the same wear marks between the arrow and the plunger button.

some comments on recurve rests:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/archery-folk/k6s2majeLWc
 


Last edited:

JohnK

Well-known member
I seem to remember reading that the now retired top archer Martinus Grov of Norway used a rigid arrow rest in the form of a nail.
 


Matt Francis

New member
So for those that use it in free flyte mode, how do you go about loading an arrow? do you hold the wire out, put the arrow on, then under the clicker? I tried it and it seemed fiddly, but i guess with practise you get the hang of it. I think i am just paranoid about it flicking back before i release.
 


buzz lite beer

Well-known member
Loading is a little more fiddly than using it in conventional magnetic way, but you quickly become accustom to it,
and the only way you'll find if you are going to have issues is to give it a go :)
 


Mark31121

Member
Ironman
I used a magnetic clicker so there was a gap between the riser and the clicker (about half way up the clicker ) so I used to push the arrow through that gap whilst holding the rest out - it was a bit fiddly I must admit...
 


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