Short range bosses no longer recommended?

Mufti

Member
Not having access to a coaching manual (that's another topic forconversation) . . .

I was advised that the minimum distance for shooting is now 10 yards.
So no more blank bosses at 2 yards for blind shooting and nock position checking!

What coaching method is currently recommended for blind boss shooting these days?
What coaching method is currently recommended for nock position checks (apart from the shoot through a paper sheet method).
 


Aleatorian

Member
From the Level one Coaching course, 10yds is the minimum "safe" distance, ensuring good distance in case of bouncers.
This is mainly aimed at low poundage bows as these have a higher tendency to not penetrate targets. If you feel comfortable shooting at ~2yds for blind shooting either at home, or if your club allows it and are confident that you aren't going to cause potential injury to yourself or others then that is something completely different.
 


Mufti

Member
Thank you for that, what method(s) are proposed for blind shooting or is that a thing of the past now?
 


Aleatorian

Member
Blind shooting isn't something that is mentioned in the Level one course, as this is purely aimed at running beginners courses/getting people started in the world of archery with a good foundation for shooting technique and information into the sort and how things work.

I can't say if it is mentioned higher up the coaching regime.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Blind shooting can be a real "eye opener".
If the archer is simply going to shoot with eyes closed; then I have to wonder what is their objective.
If the archer has a reason for doing blind shooting, they need to know, in advance, what they will be looking for in order to learn from the experience.
Perhaps "looking for" is a rather narrow term, but I mean it in the wider sense and not just looking with the eyes.
I think the idea that it is "a thing of the past", could have stemmed from some misuse of the exercise. Some archers do blind shooting because they have a problem and they blind shoot to overcome it. Their blind shooting goes well so they shoot at 50y and find they are no better than before. Blind shooting, for them, was a waste of time. The idea can spread round the club, then round other clubs,perhaps.
 


Mufti

Member
Some folks have difficulty in "feeling" the shot, removing the aiming aspect of a routine entirely helps to focus the mind on what they are doing.
Removing one of the senses (sight) brings the other senses more sharply into focus.

I have found great benefit in this method personally when needing to understand back tension and expansion through the clicker.
It has been something I have gained from many years ago and stays with me to this day (unlike your 50y example Geoff).

There must always be a purpose to such things and it is self awareness in this case.
An understanding and feel for what is going on behind you (your back) is not something that everyone can achieve without help sometimes.
I asked an archer yesterday what their bow felt like when shot, they had no concept of a bow "feeling" like anything (another use for blind shooting perhaps).
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi Mufti, My example was a way of possibly explaining how the idea came about that blind shooting is " a thing of the past".
I think it is valuable for all sorts of things, and like you, I don't think it is something you just DO and it makes you a better archer. I have heard people say they are going to do some blind shooting; and I have asked them why. Some say things like, " It's good, isn't it?"
But if you don't know what you are looking for, how will you know if you find it?
One of the interesting results that come from blind shooting can be the way the time taken to complete the shot changes.
Some find they speed up; others slow down. Some lose all their hesitation; others can't release with any confidence and hold on too long.
 


Rik

Supporter
Supporter
Shooting at a blank boss can be used at any distance (and can be an eye opener). Shooting blind has to be very short. 10 yards sounds too long. I'm not sure what value it has though. Too much of shooting is tied up with head position.

For nock position, I think the advice is (as always) bare shaft at 30m.

There used to be a very short range method which involves looking at the angle of a shaft immediately after it has left the bow, but it's of questionable use unless you have a very flat, uniform boss. Coiled straw would be more or less useless, unless you use statistical techniques. For other short range methods (edge of a target face) 10 yards is fine.
 


KidCurry

Well-known member
This could impact paper tuning for compounds at clubs. 10yds is quite a way to set the boss with paper at 3yds unless you use small sheets of paper and a small shoot through frame, a real pain. Having said that, in 30 years of shooting compound I have never had a bouncer!
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
A wide sheet of paper is OK so long as you move your feet between shots so you face the paper square on.
I know toilet roll isn't the right paper, but imagine proper paper on a roll.
A tall piece of paper could produce arrows both over and under the boss.
 


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