[Warbow] taking up the warbow

yewbow

New member
Hi all

I would like to start to shoot the hevyer bows the full compass warbows. i have been shooting target longbows for some time now 50lb at 28" is the most draw i have shot but would like to move up. There seems to be no clubs were i live that shoot them in telford. what would be the best and safe way to lern how to shoot them and what draw to start with ? and the best place to get one i make my own bows but this seems to be a very differnt best and it may beond my skill:archer2:
 


yewbow

New member
Thats grate i will get in tuch thank you. i take it you shoot the warbow is it hard to lern i have seen on youtube and the chaps on there say it takes years . i was thinking of starting with 80lb or is that a bit wimpy of me. Thats if i can find one
 


stevesjem

New member
Thats grate i will get in tuch thank you. i take it you shoot the warbow is it hard to lern i have seen on youtube and the chaps on there say it takes years . i was thinking of starting with 80lb or is that a bit wimpy of me. Thats if i can find one


You should find all the info you want at EWBS, but feel free to PM me.
Cheers
Steve
 


Archer E

New member
I got into archery because of my interest in war bows. I've not had a lot of practice, but I started with a 45# longbow. I've probably only shot about 2000 arrows with it, but recently picked up a 73# used longbow at a great price. I can only shoot about 3 dozen arrows with the 73# bow until my accuracy suffers, so I drop back down to my 45#.

I can shoot all day with the 45# and plan on building up to shooting 150 arrows at a time with the 73# bow. My question is where do I go from there? I want to eventually be able to shoot a 100-120# war bow with reasonable accuracy. Once I can shoot about 150 arrows with the 73# bow, what should I step up to?

Thanks,

Mark
 


blakey

Active member
I got into archery because of my interest in war bows. I've not had a lot of practice, but I started with a 45# longbow. I've probably only shot about 2000 arrows with it, but recently picked up a 73# used longbow at a great price. I can only shoot about 3 dozen arrows with the 73# bow until my accuracy suffers, so I drop back down to my 45#.

I can shoot all day with the 45# and plan on building up to shooting 150 arrows at a time with the 73# bow. My question is where do I go from there? I want to eventually be able to shoot a 100-120# war bow with reasonable accuracy. Once I can shoot about 150 arrows with the 73# bow, what should I step up to?

Thanks,

Mark
The EWBS is probably a better bet than me to confirm this, but I very much doubt if anyone shoots 150 arrows with a warbow in one go. Historically in a battle/charge the bowmen would get only a few minutes before the cavalry were on them. Agincourt was the exception to this because the silly buggers advanced on foot. I wouldn't think you'd want to train to shoot too many? I'd be interested to know myself what the EWBS shoots at a meet? As for going up in poundage, I know a lot of blokes who've gone too far. Just do it 10 lbs at a time. The ancestors trained for years and grew into their warbows. (And were fairly twisted). Look after yourself. I know blokes who've had 6 months out with torn rotators. Good luck.

- - - Updated - - -

Hi all

I would like to start to shoot the hevyer bows the full compass warbows. i have been shooting target longbows for some time now 50lb at 28" is the most draw i have shot but would like to move up. There seems to be no clubs were i live that shoot them in telford. what would be the best and safe way to lern how to shoot them and what draw to start with ? and the best place to get one i make my own bows but this seems to be a very differnt best and it may beond my skill:archer2:
Just a thought, have you tried "shooting in the bow" yet. Very different technique to target and and much longer draw. Cheers
 


Raven's_Eye

Active member
Ironman
Agincourt was the exception to this because the silly buggers advanced on foot.
Actually that is probably the most sensible thing they did that day if not the only.With past battles of Crecy and Poiters still in mind their horses were very vulnerable even when protected by some armour you couldn't coat a horse in armour like a knight. A good cavalry charge is where the knights are almost knee to knee, so you can understand by taking out a horse doesn't take out that one knight but also cause the ones either side to stumble and it causes and obsticle for the ranks behind. Marching on foot if a knight drops a man can react quicker than a horse to avoid the sudden obsticle.
 


DavidH

New member
The idea of jumping from 50# to 80# in one go doesn't seem realistic and I wonder what you are actually trying to achieve. I admire anyone who can shoot high poundage but they've spent years building up to it.
 


WillS

New member
The idea of jumping from 50# to 80# in one go doesn't seem realistic and I wonder what you are actually trying to achieve. I admire anyone who can shoot high poundage but they've spent years building up to it.
Depends entirely on technique, I think. That's what I found, anyway. Shooting a light 50# longbow in traditional "Victorian" style, where you're using mainly arm muscles to pull the string back is VERY different to settling into an 80# longbow or warbow and using your entire body. You just don't need to use your body with a 50# bow, whereas you suddenly find a WHOLE load of strength and leverage if you're drawing 80# or so. I was stunned when I was handed a 75# bow (I had been shooting only a 50# at this point) and was shown how to shoot "in the bow" and it didn't feel anything like an increase of 25lbs, it was a totally different technique and as such it felt very comfortable.

I would say try it with a bow of your own - take a 50# longbow and draw it using a wide rotation of your right elbow, coming almost over your head and rolling back, so it's your whole shoulder and back muscle doing all the work - but it's very likely that you'll overdraw instantly as it's so easy to do, and probably ruin your bow!
 


DavidH

New member
Don't or shouldn't all archers use back and shoulder muscles WillS? I know I do. And a light Victorian bow? Try giving it to someone who shoots recurve and see what they say. I agree warbows have a different style when your shooting IN the bow - but most archers use their back and definitely NOT their arm. Sorry to jump on you, but its a fundamental of archery
 


ghound

New member
I shoot a 40lb bow, and to be honest cos i'm a fairly big bloke it's a doodle to draw and i haven't got a clue which muscles i'm using, but i guess if you have a bow that stacks it would be a different thing, esp if it were of a warbow poundage..
 


WillS

New member
Don't or shouldn't all archers use back and shoulder muscles WillS? I know I do. And a light Victorian bow? Try giving it to someone who shoots recurve and see what they say. I agree warbows have a different style when your shooting IN the bow - but most archers use their back and definitely NOT their arm. Sorry to jump on you, but its a fundamental of archery
Yeah, I agree. I read that back and realised how daft it sounded, sorry!

What I was trying to say was that there is MORE back and shoulder effort when shooting "in the bow" than when drawing something like 50#. Is 50# not considered light in longbows? I thought it was pretty light!

Basically, when I go to my local club on a Sunday to shoot, I will take a couple of bows, one around 50# and one somewhere between 75# and 90#. If I was to shoot the 50#, it would be essentially a warm up. Changing to the heavier bows, the second I start to shoot, I feel my back and shoulders really working, in slightly different places to when I'm shooting the 50#.

Perhaps it's because to me personally the 50# seems so light, so I just can't feel what the muscles are doing with it?

But yes, I agree with you - all shooting should be done from the shoulders/back, and not just brute strength on the arm muscles.
 


Archer E

New member
The EWBS is probably a better bet than me to confirm this, but I very much doubt if anyone shoots 150 arrows with a warbow in one go. Historically in a battle/charge the bowmen would get only a few minutes before the cavalry were on them. Agincourt was the exception to this because the silly buggers advanced on foot. I wouldn't think you'd want to train to shoot too many? I'd be interested to know myself what the EWBS shoots at a meet? As for going up in poundage, I know a lot of blokes who've gone too far. Just do it 10 lbs at a time. The ancestors trained for years and grew into their warbows. (And were fairly twisted). Look after yourself. I know blokes who've had 6 months out with torn rotators. Good luck.
Sorry, I wasn't very clear there; I don't think that I'll be shooting anywhere near 150 arrows with a warbow. That's what I do with the 45# bow and I could keep going but for the time it takes. I'm in Canada and it's hard to find bows over 45#, so that's what I started with and that's why I bought the 73# bow when I had the chance. I think I'll have to start making my own bows if I'm going to go up by 10 lbs at a time, both from a cost standpoint and due to lack of availability. Thanks for the advice on taking care of myself. I'll definitely do that as I'm not as young as I used to be and I can't afford to be laid up for any length of time.


The idea of jumping from 50# to 80# in one go doesn't seem realistic and I wonder what you are actually trying to achieve. I admire anyone who can shoot high poundage but they've spent years building up to it.
That's a bit of an odd statement given that you've never seen me shoot nor what I look like physically. I haven't had any difficulty with the 73# bow. As stated, I'm trying to achieve the ability to shoot a 100-120# bow with reasonable accuracy. I'm not sure what else I could possibly be trying to achieve. As for spending years building up to it, that's what I figure it will take, so I'm starting now.
 


DavidH

New member
That's a bit of an odd statement given that you've never seen me shoot nor what I look like physically. I haven't had any difficulty with the 73# bow. As stated, I'm trying to achieve the ability to shoot a 100-120# bow with reasonable accuracy. I'm not sure what else I could possibly be trying to achieve. As for spending years building up to it, that's what I figure it will take, so I'm starting now.
That wasnt aimed at you Archer E, it was to the original poster who has never shot more than 50#
 


Raven's_Eye

Active member
Ironman
@WillS: 50lbs is about average for a gents longbow, maybe pushing 65lbs being a heavier one for longdistances (esp those of us not gifted with long arms)

Thing is witha warbow you have to remember is that you aren't drawing to your chin but to your ear so you are using more muscles to pull it that far back, and using the weight of your body as well. Though I would have thought its best if you can get someone to show you how to do this, just so you don't end up damaging yourself really.
 


WillS

New member
@WillS: 50lbs is about average for a gents longbow, maybe pushing 65lbs being a heavier one for longdistances (esp those of us not gifted with long arms)
Fair enough! I started with a 50# so I assumed that was fairly lightweight.

Thing is witha warbow you have to remember is that you aren't drawing to your chin but to your ear so you are using more muscles to pull it that far back, and using the weight of your body as well. Though I would have thought its best if you can get someone to show you how to do this, just so you don't end up damaging yourself really.
This is very true. There are few videos or tutorials on shooting in the bow, so it's easy to get it wrong. There's a really nice video on the rolling loose demonstrated by Glennan Carnie that gives a rough idea on how it's done - I've put the link below.

Rolling Loose.wmv - YouTube
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
Fair enough! I started with a 50# so I assumed that was fairly lightweight.



This is very true. There are few videos or tutorials on shooting in the bow, so it's easy to get it wrong. There's a really nice video on the rolling loose demonstrated by Glennan Carnie that gives a rough idea on how it's done - I've put the link below.

Rolling Loose.wmv - YouTube
That is IMO an awfull loose.
I have nothing per se against a 'rolling loose' but to my mind that is a horrible example.
1. There is no need to go wander off or leaping off after loose.
2. The big thing is, if you watch the slow mo' he's holding the bow at full draw for an age!
If the forward momentum is valuable to distance, then one should be reaching full draw during the forward motion and loosing immediately. A bow held at full draw (on the tiller or in your hand) is dropping poundage all the time it's held.
Yeah yeah, I know I'll get the usual flak about 'can you do it' etc from the warbow guys.
Del
 


DavidH

New member
I wouldn't like to see anyone doing that loose on the line. Might p*ss of the Field captain a bit. I'd actually say its damn dangerous!
 


WillS

New member
Yeah, the rolling loose ain't for everybody. It was the rotation of his shoulder that enforced the point i was making. They claim the skip off the line gives the arrow more kick or something but unless its PERFECT (which I've never seen!) it surely can't do a thing.
 


blakey

Active member
Actually that is probably the most sensible thing they did that day if not the only.With past battles of Crecy and Poiters still in mind their horses were very vulnerable even when protected by some armour you couldn't coat a horse in armour like a knight. A good cavalry charge is where the knights are almost knee to knee, so you can understand by taking out a horse doesn't take out that one knight but also cause the ones either side to stumble and it causes and obsticle for the ranks behind. Marching on foot if a knight drops a man can react quicker than a horse to avoid the sudden obsticle.
10,000+ dead and hundreds captured? Slogging on foot in heavy armour through thick mud against 6,000 archers each of whom could shoot a minimum of 12 arrows a minute. 5 minutes in the killing zone, at least one quarter million arrows to negotiate. Beyond silly, borders on the Pythonesque. Sensible thing to have done would have been to pay them to go home.
 


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