Waxing the String

Finch

New member
After a decent shoot on Friday night (480 on a Portsmouth - I scored a MISS with one arrow, gutted!) I spent Sunday re-configuring the bow and doing some general maintenance. Initially I was procrastinating as I really didn't feel like going for a run.

I reset the spigarelli rest and configured my new Shibuya button for my ACC arrows in prep for the Short National shoot on the 29th. Setting the centre shot wasn't hard but I will need to shoot a few ends to tune the button. Of course, right now I still don't know any sight marks for 50 or 40 yards as I have only shot at 20. I am told there will be an hour or so before the comp on the day for sight mark tuning so as long as the arrow is flying straight then I can cope with that.

I also took the opportunity while the bow was assembled to check and make sure all the bolts were tight, a generally look over (admiring its beauty really) and waxing the string, something I never did on the old bow!

Never having done it before I search online for the method and used the article on the WA website to see how to do it. Thankfully I had some paracord in the garage so used that to melt the wax into the string.

I had been looking for a different finger sling as the one I am using right now feels a tad short. I realised that paracord may well do the job (in place of a shoe lace...) so played for a bit and watched a couple of YouTube videos on how to do it. My wife returned from having breakfast with a friend and magically produced a pair of flourescent yellow laces and a pair of laces with classic Minis down them. The result is that I now have 4 finger slings of slightly differing lengths and materials that I can try at the next shoot to see how I get on with them.

I can think of worse ways to spend a Sunday morning. Never did get the run in though...
 


LionOfNarnia

Supporter
Supporter
480 is decent for a Pompey :)

(My best is 469)

I wax my string about every month, with 'Black Forest' scented Flex Sense-and-Feel. I use a pair of 'engineers' gloves (kidskin) to prevent burns while I warm the string & button thread to remove the excess wax.

It's all just part of the ritual of being a toxophile.

- admiring the beauty of your implement is too ;)
 


Rabid Hamster

Active member
Ironman
Never been happy using anything other than my fingers to 'melt' the wax into the string. My fingers will never generate enough heat to damage the string BUT anything else might if you generate enough friction.
as shown here .....
 


LionOfNarnia

Supporter
Supporter
I don't generate any more heat than fingers alone can - but I do it in 1/3 of the time & don't risk nasty friction burns. They are very 'precise' gloves, I can tie my shoelaces or even roll a 'ciggie' with them on ;)
 


My Birtwistle 71" flatbow is strung with Fastflyte, and it responds well to a good waxing with (gasp) leather preservative from the bootmakers. There's no waiting, no risk of friction burns, and the string will tell you when it's had enough. Pay particular attention to the Flemish twist loops.
 


oldnut

Supporter
Supporter
hmmm, I have 8 elbs and 2 horse bows and I have never waxed a string. I change them when needed as soon as they look worn. I only shoot for a couple of hours on a sunday, so not that many hours. does waxing make the string last longer, if so but what?
 


Rabid Hamster

Active member
Ironman
It binds the threads of the string together so working efficiently, keeps them from wearing prematurely and waterproofs the string. A soggy string isnt efficient and a hairy string desperately needs waxing.
Such diverse archery sources as archery uk and lancaster archery websites both recommend waxing but If you dont wax and just replace then thats up to you. Personally i make 2 strings a season, shoot them in then take care of them (8190 and diamondback serving is expensive). I shoot 3 times a week, in some pretty awful scottish weather and my strings are never an issue.
 


Corax67

Active member
I wax my string about every 4th session, shoot an ELB primarily, because it’s how I was taught when I first took up shooting.

A basic block of pure beeswax from beekeepers at a country fair is my choice and I melt it into the string with a piece of thin leather salvaged from inside a riding boot, with that you can feel just how much heat you are generating so you don’t get things too warm.



Karl
 


LionOfNarnia

Supporter
Supporter
I'm waxing my string tonight as the weather forecast for our club compo 2moz promises that precipitation will be a factor.

"Forewarned is forearmed" ;)
 


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