[Warbow] where the mary rose warbows stiff or bendy handle?

WillS

New member
The "40 minutes to tiller a bow" is missleading at best and b0ll0cks at worst.
Sure you can tiller a bow in 40 minutes if it's already roughed out from a clean even stave or a laminate.(Also if you are doing it regularly) but it shouldn't be your aim.
Steady on! I said the top bowyers can do it. Not that everybody should be doing it.

The point was that the majority of the work is spent on getting the bow as close to final proportions as possible, getting both limbs even and the dimensions super close. Tillering for the experts is like a final check that all the hard work done on the bench was correct.

The rest of us have to use tillering to do half the work - that's where we find out what's working and what isn't. It's not a bad thing, it just reduces potential performance. If the bow is on the tiller for 30-40 mins, just being checked and worked to full draw rather than constantly pulled, released, pulled, released, removed, worked on, pulled, released... You end up with less set and more oomph. Not so much with yew, but certainly with white woods.
 


WillS

New member
Yes the limbs take some curve at full draw, I've seen some very long, longbows on the shooting line and there limbs barely move.
Just as a side thought, the laminations in the bow are full length, and im guessing if they were jointed behind the handel they may be be prone to cracking compaired to a victorian type bow where the handel hardly moves? Don't know im not a bowyer?
Well interestingly enough, there are people out there who can join two pieces of yew in the handle and make the bow come full compass at stupidly high weights. Joe Gibbs made a 160# yew bow using a simple Z splice, with no backing or belly laminates to support either. I think it just takes some monster cahones and lots of experience.

I've never done it, but I've got some perfect yew billets just waiting to be tried...
 


Raven's_Eye

Active member
Ironman
Well interestingly enough, there are people out there who can join two pieces of yew in the handle and make the bow come full compass at stupidly high weights. Joe Gibbs made a 160# yew bow using a simple Z splice, with no backing or belly laminates to support either. I think it just takes some monster cahones and lots of experience.

I've never done it, but I've got some perfect yew billets just waiting to be tried...
Think that would just scare me.
 


WillS

New member
Think that would just scare me.
Me too! Think I'm a good few years away from trusting myself that much.

The great thing about having people like Joe around is that he's done all the "boring" stuff already, that the rest of us are still trying to perfect. That means he can go nuts and do things with stunning pieces of yew that nobody else would want to attempt. It's like watching a new set of guidelines and tutorials being written in front of you.

The majority of bowyers splice a bow in the handle and by habit leave it stiff, because just the effort and work that goes into a splice is time consuming and fiddly. The idea of it blowing up is probably a bit unsettling. If you can get your hands on a regular flow of the best yew available, why worry? Do stupid things with it, and if it goes bang then it goes bang. If it works, you end up re-writing what everybody else assumes is fact.
 


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